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  1. #161
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    I just bid on a Pradovit 250 slide projector on Ebay. I'm a little worried I'm going to win.

  2. #162
    keithwms's Avatar
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    I could use a good 6X7 projector...
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #163

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    Quote Originally Posted by PKM-25 View Post
    ME Super wrote:
    Sadly when slide film is gone, my presentations will probably largely go d*****l. Notice I didn't say capture... I've scanned some negatives I shot last spring and the detail in them is quite good, even when viewed on a computer screen. Guess I'll have to start saving up a few bucks for that other kind of projector that really stinks.


    PKM-25 responds:
    Don't be sad, be smart and prepare, try to come up with plans that lay out what you need to do in 5 year blocks, that is what I did with Kodachrome and it payed off, I shot over 35,000 Kodachromes in a span of less than 5 years, no crying, no regrets, just amazing images...
    I will have to do that. The main reason I shoot slides is that I like to project them in a dark room. They look so much better on a real slide projector than they do in digital. Plus my daughter says they're pretty and my son loves them too. Shoot, maybe I should change my moniker to "E6 Curmudgeon"
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  4. #164
    Aristophanes's Avatar
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    Slide film pushed camera development.

    AE, bracketing, phase detect AF, matrix metering, and so on to make up for the lack of exposure latitude. These were features required by pros who were the drivers of slide film use.

    The shame is that a late 90's to early-2000's SLR is the optimum slide film capture device. The number of keepers goes way up with these. Many advanced P&S's were also very good. Another shame is that slide film scans very well.

    Kodak and Fuji marketed slide films extensively, and even upped the effort when digital came out, especially in photo magazines targeted at the pro and nearly-pro markets. It was a losing battle, mostly because of costs. As the qualitative differences between digital and slide film narrowed, the cost delta widened, making professional digital systems the better economic choice. Marketing cannot overcome that delta. Without pros the market pretty much collapsed.

  5. #165

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristophanes View Post
    Slide film pushed camera development.

    AE, bracketing, phase detect AF, matrix metering, and so on to make up for the lack of exposure latitude. These were features required by pros who were the drivers of slide film use.
    In my work experience of dealing with pros. most of them used manual equipment, e.g. Hasselblad, Rollei and other MF, or LF Linhofs, etc. The extras which you mention were mainly directed at the advanced amateur...developments marketed to those who liked to have the latest gizmos to impress their friends. Rather like the massive digital cameras with lenses like elephants trunks which some like to sport these days. (along with their huge SUV's which never go futher off-road than the supermarket car park.....)

  6. #166
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Have to agree having worked in photograpghy professionally since the early 1970's I've never seen a pro use a camera with "AE, bracketing, phase detect AF, matrix metering, and so on to make up for the lack of exposure latitude." until the switch to digital camers where unfortunately the major manufacturers insist on adding too many deatures.

    Ian

  7. #167
    Aristophanes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by railwayman3 View Post
    In my work experience of dealing with pros. most of them used manual equipment, e.g. Hasselblad, Rollei and other MF, or LF Linhofs, etc. The extras which you mention were mainly directed at the advanced amateur...developments marketed to those who liked to have the latest gizmos to impress their friends. Rather like the massive digital cameras with lenses like elephants trunks which some like to sport these days. (along with their huge SUV's which never go futher off-road than the supermarket car park.....)
    I was thinking mostly of the journalist photographers who were the bulk of the market as the employer covered the costs of equipment and processing. Think sports photography, Time, Life, National Geographic (with an enormous selection of Kodachrome slides shot on 135) etc. The Olympics and all those Canon sewer pipes hooked to 35mm. The local newspaper. The photo scrum. The paparazzi. Wedding photogs in my experience were 50/50 135 and 120, usually both.

    The icon of a "photo event" is the banks of pro photogs lined up with auto gear, taking shots from the hip or elevated without even looking through the VF. Auto exposure and fast advance were designed for that market and were top tier Nikon and Canon product all the way. They were never designed for the "advanced amateur" in development save to bulk the market and margins. It was the newsrooms that demanded those products, and they paid big $$$ for them.

    These commercial entities devoured film, and as glossy publications thrived, they used slide film more and more, with the camera tech adapting to their needs. I was at Mt. Ventoux as the Tour de France climbed up the slope and in retrospect, of the thousands of pro photogs there, I bet more than 100,000 film shots were blasted in the space of 2 hours by only journalists, and that's just of the final ascent. All you could hear in the background as each group ascended was the whir of the motor drives. MF studio photogs save in some fashion shoots never even came close to that volume. How much was slide film I don't know, but I saw an awful lot of Kodachrome and Velvia auto-loaded.

  8. #168
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    Okay, screw Ektachrome. All I need is Ektar and a print film like Vericolor 5072. O bugger, seems that I'll have to stick with Fujichrome like I've done for so many years now.
    Fred

  9. #169
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdrx View Post
    seems that I'll have to stick with Fujichrome like I've done for so many years now.
    +1
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #170

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    Certainly the long-lens 35mm was the camera for sports and action and the other uses which you mention, and these are the photographers which everyone sees and thinks of from their visibilty on TV coverage. A bank of 20-30 photographers can soon look like "thousands" in these circumstances. Photographers for magazines such as the Nat Geographic certainly used many pictures, but it is basically only one magazine.

    I could argue that, for every one of those, there were many less visible photographers using manual cameras....studios, portraiture, advertising, product photography, commercial, industrial, police, pathology and medical (the ones which I personally dealt with), in every city in the land.

    I'm not arguing, it is a matter of opinion and personal experience, but I think it is too easy to present things as a "fact" to support one's own views, rather than as a suggestion or
    discussion point.



 

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