Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,970   Posts: 1,523,469   Online: 947
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,546

    Ultra super crazy large format

    And I thought Clyde Butcher had the biggest trays.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/pictureshow...nt?sc=fb&cc=fp

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,740
    Wow!

    Jeff

  3. #3
    kwmullet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Denton, TX, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    889
    Images
    16
    Astonishing project. I doubt he uses trays, but that's not the point.

    I've been a huge fan of NPR for decades, but I'm really growing weary of their stellar topic selection being followed up by a really rather inept job of commentary or reporting. I doubt that their leaps in logic and imposition of their own spin on a lovely story that stands on its own would even pass muster in middle school, let alone the hypercompetitive market of professional journalism post web2.x.

    Dismissing the aircraft hangar project because it was lensless as a camera obscura? She seems to have just learned about the project one Google search ago and didn't have the attention span to keep reading and see the huge negative that resulted.

    The story is not "look at the curious death throe of this technology from antiquity" but "as photography continues to expand into every nook and cranny of modern life, film photographers explore amazing niches that can help illustrate what sets that type of photography apart from others."






    Sent from my EVO3d using Tapatalk

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Newtown, PA USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    407
    Quote Originally Posted by kwmullet View Post
    Astonishing project. I doubt he uses trays, but that's not the point.

    I've been a huge fan of NPR for decades, but I'm really growing weary of their stellar topic selection being followed up by a really rather inept job of commentary or reporting. I doubt that their leaps in logic and imposition of their own spin on a lovely story that stands on its own would even pass muster in middle school, let alone the hypercompetitive market of professional journalism post web2.x.

    Dismissing the aircraft hangar project because it was lensless as a camera obscura? She seems to have just learned about the project one Google search ago and didn't have the attention span to keep reading and see the huge negative that resulted.

    The story is not "look at the curious death throe of this technology from antiquity" but "as photography continues to expand into every nook and cranny of modern life, film photographers explore amazing niches that can help illustrate what sets that type of photography apart from others."






    Sent from my EVO3d using Tapatalk
    On the topic of NPR; that is the product of a socialized media outlet that will receive funding whether or not they can attract ratings, and a public outlet that must produce quality, desirable content in order to pay bills.

    As for this camera, that is just awesome. I'm wondering how he gets film for this beast? Is that the size of a full width of sheet film from say, Kodak or Ilford off of their coating line? Or does film like this have to be hand made?

  5. #5
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,783
    If you search for Manarchy on this and other photographic sites, you'll find more discussion than the subject really deserves. The project is about funding and ego, not about great photographs. For a more admirable project, consider the 60 foot long Coloramas that were displayed in NYC's Grand Central Station: http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/feat.../colorama.html
    These were done by competent photographers with ordinary cameras of decades ago.

  6. #6
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Everett, WA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    495
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    13
    Previous APUG thread: 35 foot camera...6 foot high negatives. WOW

    Manarchy charges $50,000 per two-day session. There is no optical print image made from the original negative. The film is apparently the width of a master roll, and I think that he cuts it from a roll. And I can't discuss the d****** aspects of anything else.

  7. #7
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,244
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    435
    Quote Originally Posted by PeteZ8 View Post
    On the topic of NPR; that is the product of a socialized media outlet that will receive funding whether or not they can attract ratings, and a public outlet that must produce quality, desirable content in order to pay bills.

    As for this camera, that is just awesome. I'm wondering how he gets film for this beast? Is that the size of a full width of sheet film from say, Kodak or Ilford off of their coating line? Or does film like this have to be hand made?
    For the grief you're giving NPR, you are forgetting that they produce stories, worthwhile stories, that would never see light of day in a commercial medium precisely because they wouldn't move enough ad dollars. Public broadcasting is a worthwhile project - if you need further evidence, look at Ken Burns' documentaries on the Civil War and the National Parks. Sure, there are arguments that can be made about Ken Burns' style, but the same arguments can be made in volume about much work on commercial television. Given the scope of Ken Burns' projects, and the amount of airtime they require to view in full, they'd never get aired on CBS or NBC. Even HBO or Starz would be unlikely to fund and air such projects. So I'll gladly keep supporting public broadcasting with my tax dollars and my donations.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    For the grief you're giving NPR, you are forgetting that they produce stories, worthwhile stories, that would never see light of day in a commercial medium precisely because they wouldn't move enough ad dollars. Public broadcasting is a worthwhile project - if you need further evidence, look at Ken Burns' documentaries on the Civil War and the National Parks. Sure, there are arguments that can be made about Ken Burns' style, but the same arguments can be made in volume about much work on commercial television. Given the scope of Ken Burns' projects, and the amount of airtime they require to view in full, they'd never get aired on CBS or NBC. Even HBO or Starz would be unlikely to fund and air such projects. So I'll gladly keep supporting public broadcasting with my tax dollars and my donations.
    I agree that NPR and PBS, also, offer some very interesting programming. I saw a show on my local PBS station in East Lansing, MI that described how Lansing looked 50-75 years ago. It showed pictures and films of things that are no longer here. I loved the show, bc I have a interest in nostalgia. HOWEVER, having said that.......I would never donate one dime to public broadcasting for one reason: More so that even the mainstream media (MSNBC, CNN, CBS, NY Times, etc......) NPR, and PBS are infested with Leftists. I don't mean your mainstream liberal, Democrats...I mean hardcore Leftists. These people (let's just use NPR as an example,) have an agenda, which is PRO-Obama, pro-Palestinian, anti-Israel (like the UN, BTW,) pro-Castro, etc...now, they are entitled to their opinions, and they are free to promote whomever they choose-but, not on PUBLIC money. AS a public station, they have responsiblity to be NEUTRAL, politically. Otherwise, sell commercial time. It's a JOKE that MSNBC, CNN, NY Times, etc... openly root for Obama and other Leftists-however, AT LEAST they're not asking for public donations PRETENDING to be real, neutral, journalists.

  9. #9
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,783
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    For the grief you're giving NPR, you are forgetting that they produce stories, worthwhile stories, that would never see light of day in a commercial medium precisely because they wouldn't move enough ad dollars. Public broadcasting is a worthwhile project - if you need further evidence, look at Ken Burns' documentaries on the Civil War and the National Parks. Sure, there are arguments that can be made about Ken Burns' style, but the same arguments can be made in volume about much work on commercial television. Given the scope of Ken Burns' projects, and the amount of airtime they require to view in full, they'd never get aired on CBS or NBC. Even HBO or Starz would be unlikely to fund and air such projects. So I'll gladly keep supporting public broadcasting with my tax dollars and my donations.
    I agree. Ken Burns' video on Ansel Adams may not have been as well informed as earlier films on the master, but it did provide additional information, and it is widely available. Other photographers would be almost completely unknown outside the photographic fraternity if it weren't for NPR. This is true of many other subjects, too, especially in the arts and history.

  10. #10
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,244
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    435
    Quote Originally Posted by adam hirsch View Post
    I agree that NPR and PBS, also, offer some very interesting programming. I saw a show on my local PBS station in East Lansing, MI that described how Lansing looked 50-75 years ago. It showed pictures and films of things that are no longer here. I loved the show, bc I have a interest in nostalgia. HOWEVER, having said that.......I would never donate one dime to public broadcasting for one reason: More so that even the mainstream media (MSNBC, CNN, CBS, NY Times, etc......) NPR, and PBS are infested with Leftists. I don't mean your mainstream liberal, Democrats...I mean hardcore Leftists. These people (let's just use NPR as an example,) have an agenda, which is PRO-Obama, pro-Palestinian, anti-Israel (like the UN, BTW,) pro-Castro, etc...now, they are entitled to their opinions, and they are free to promote whomever they choose-but, not on PUBLIC money. AS a public station, they have responsiblity to be NEUTRAL, politically. Otherwise, sell commercial time. It's a JOKE that MSNBC, CNN, NY Times, etc... openly root for Obama and other Leftists-however, AT LEAST they're not asking for public donations PRETENDING to be real, neutral, journalists.
    If you think NPR and PBS are, in your parlance, "Leftists", then you don't know the meaning of the word. In the US, what passes for "Leftist" is just somewhat to the left of Attila and Hitler. We have Democrats (center-right), Moderates (right), and Republicans (far-right to extreme far-right). NPR just as often undermines their so-called "leftist bias" with presenting un-critical opinions of the right as they do un-critical opinions of the left. And just because someone is pro-Palestinian does not make them anti-Israel. Both peoples have a right to exist, and both peoples deserve a homeland. The problem lies in the fact that both groups claim the same piece of land and neither group wants to share. Despite the fact that if you did DNA screening on non-European Jews and indigenous Arab populations, you probably couldn't tell them apart without labels on the test tubes. Neither side can claim to be right when they both keep provoking each other with actions that they KNOW will set the other side off on a series of reprisals.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin