Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,727   Posts: 1,515,134   Online: 1115
      
Page 2 of 13 FirstFirst 1234567812 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 129
  1. #11
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,620
    The first sustained nuclear reaction was created in a basement under the stands of the football field at the University of Chicago in 1942.
    Nobody outside the Manhattan Project even knew it was there until after the war.

    MIT still has an operational nuclear reactor, parked in the middle of Downtown Cambridge. I think it uses the same type of fuel that the Kodak reactor does/did. 90% of the people in town walk right by that reactor every day but don't even know what it is. The folks at MIT are somewhat quiet about the fact that there is a reactor sitting in the middle of their campus but if you ask them about it, you'll probably get a nonchalant, "Yeah, it's over there," as the person points it out.

    So, it's interesting to know that Kodak has/had a reactor but it's not surprising if you think about it. I don't see what everybody's getting their knickers in a twist about.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Alamo City, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    834
    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    <snip>I don't see what everybody's getting their knickers in a twist about.

  3. #13
    Helinophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    549
    Images
    19
    It was used to produce awesome photo engineers, duh!

    True story.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  4. #14
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Everett, WA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    495
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    13
    Wikipedia:
    The Atomic Energy Commission sold californium-252 to industrial and academic customers in the early 1970s for $10 per microgram ...
    So, $1.6M for the reactor? Sounds like pocket change to me.

  5. #15
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,543
    Images
    3
    I suspect many exist, or existed. The University of Michigan had an operational nuclear reactor until 2003 here in Ann Arbor.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Shanghai, China
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,686
    Images
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post

    So, it's interesting to know that Kodak has/had a reactor but it's not surprising if you think about it. I don't see what everybody's getting their knickers in a twist about.
    Google Fukishima......it will come to you.

  7. #17
    andrew.roos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Durban, South Africa
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    392
    Images
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Google Fukishima......it will come to you.
    According to http://pissinontheroses.blogspot.com...l-uranium.html Fukushima consumed 570 tons of uranium every year. A TEPCO audit at http://criepi.denken.or.jp/result/ev...powerpoint.pdf showed that 1760 tons of spent fuel was stored on site. 3.5 pounds in a research reactor, whilst concerning, is a qualitatively different proposition.

    Also, the reactor type suggests that it was subcritical - i.e. not enough nuclear material to sustain a chain reaction, so no danger of runaway as happened at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. Instead, it used the natural decay of Californium to trigger a subcritical chain reaction in the Uranium to increase the number of neutrons produced. [Edit] This is confirmed by the decomissioning plan found on the web, which states:

    "The CFX was a sub-critical assembly of uranium-235 surrounding a Cf-252 source.
    The function of the U-235 fuel was to multiply the neutrons coming from the Cf-252
    source, which fissions spontaneously. The CFX was designed never to exceed a Keif of
    0.99. The CFX assembly yielded sufficient neutron fluxes for applications such as
    neutron activation analysis."
    Last edited by andrew.roos; 05-14-2012 at 12:43 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18
    andrew.roos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Durban, South Africa
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    392
    Images
    10
    I had to shut mine down to make space for my darkroom.
    On the plus side, the residual background gives great Sabatier effect.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    OH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,789
    Images
    2
    A number of universities have research reactors. Reed College has one too - they let undergrads run it

  10. #20
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,038
    Images
    48
    Did you know? Kodak Park had a nuclear reactor
    By Steve Orr, Staff Writer, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.com, May 11, 2012

    Photo included.

    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

Page 2 of 13 FirstFirst 1234567812 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin