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Thread: Fotokemika ...

  1. #71
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    There are lots of great films out there. While Fotokemika have said they will continue making film, obviously shutting down their paper production is an ominous sign. But losing their incredible Emaks and Varycon papers is a severe blow to anyone that likes to print in the darkroom.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #72
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Kodak IR film was sold independently of any pressing or huge need by the military. It was sold as a consumer film for the first 35mm cameras sold by EK. In fact, they advertize its used with the early cameras.

    PE

  3. #73
    brian d's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Just curious, but why do you need such a slow film in sheets? The reason for tolerating a very slow film, for me, was to get very fine grain.
    Speaking just for myself, for what I like to do it just works the best. I like to use a SpeedGraphic at antique equipment shows, usually in mid day summer sun and not a situation where I want to be messing with filters etc. and a lot of the time I'm trying to catch motion blur so high shutter speed is out of the question.
    One of my photo's is in this years Steam Engine calender, shot on EFKE 25. Using the slow film I was able to catch the exact look I wanted right away without having to "set up the shot" I am certain that if I had been using even a 100 speed film I could not have got the look I wanted right then.
    Real men use Speed Graphics and flashbulbs.

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian d View Post
    Speaking just for myself, for what I like to do it just works the best. I like to use a SpeedGraphic at antique equipment shows, usually in mid day summer sun and not a situation where I want to be messing with filters etc. and a lot of the time I'm trying to catch motion blur so high shutter speed is out of the question.
    One of my photo's is in this years Steam Engine calender, shot on EFKE 25. Using the slow film I was able to catch the exact look I wanted right away without having to "set up the shot" I am certain that if I had been using even a 100 speed film I could not have got the look I wanted right then.
    +1

    I find that the Efke 25 films are a perfect match for any camera that has a top shutter speed ranging from 1/100 through 1/500, which includes many, many rangefinders and others from the 1930s through the 60s. Even my Fuji GL690, which was probably built in the 70s or 80s, loves Efke 25 film. Ilford's Pan F 50 can be pressed into service if need be but it will not give the same look as the slightly older style emulsions used in the Efke films.

  5. #75
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Ok. I'm not against it, just wondering. My own 4x5 could benefit from more speed rather than less. I normally shoot TMY-2 and that's usually fast enough but I find myself shooting near sundown, with wind moveing things I don't want motion blurred or whatever. Most of the time I could also be fine with 100 speed, but I certainly never have had a need for anything slower than 100, especially considering I normally shoot with at least a #8 and more often a #12 yellow filter already and, even if I did, modern films will not suffer the slightest from a one stop overexposure.

    The above is in reference to 4x5. With handheld cameras I'd go beyond saying I never need anything slower than 100 to saying that I can rarely use anything slower. I do shoot some Pan F+ but I develop that in Diafine to get what speed I can and to tame the contrast a bit. And it's not that often I find I can use it. But I rarely shoot in bright sun.

    Just goes to show, that's why even now there are many different films.

  6. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    ND filters. Plus I usually want very shallow depth of field only for portraits, and I don't shoot portraits in bright sun. If I find myself there and wanting to do so, I at least find some open shade. YMMV of course - but still not in 4x5. In 35mm you do have Pan F. It's a nice film, though I shoot it at 64 in Diafine.
    I am sorry if I was not plain enough in my answer. ISO 100 film is too fast. Specifically, lets consider this lens:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The 250mm f2.0 Zuiko. Maximum aperture is f2.0. This lens takes special 46mm rear filters. As far as I have been able to determine, Olympus never made any Neutral Density filters for this lens. The only other possibility is that you can mount a 128mm filter to the front of the lens, but the only commonly available option in this size is a filter that Pentax made for their medium format tele lenses and they aren't neutral density. The only other possibility for ND filters would be to modify an existing 46 mm ND filter. If you could find me a proper 2 or 3 stop ND filter for this lens, I will pay big bucks for it.

    If I just wanted to stop down, why would I bother to use a lens like this? Why not just use a common 200mm f4 lens and be done with it? For bright conditions, I cannot shoot this lens wide open unless I use a slow film.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  7. #77
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    So did Fotokemika say they were going to continue making film or not? The news is about paper, folks.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #78
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mopar_guy View Post

    If I just wanted to stop down, why would I bother to use a lens like this? Why not just use a common 200mm f4 lens and be done with it? For bright conditions, I cannot shoot this lens wide open unless I use a slow film.
    Good question. Why on earth WOULD you use a lens like that in bright light? It's a special purpose built low light lens.

    You were clear. There are always special cases and enough other people have made the point that I concede there is an apparent need for slow films though I don't ever personally need them. But come on - shooting that lens wide open in sun? Why?

  9. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    You were clear. There are always special cases and enough other people have made the point that I concede there is an apparent need for slow films though I don't ever personally need them. But come on - shooting that lens wide open in sun? Why?
    Same reason I shoot an SMC Pentax 135mm at f1.8, or my Zeiss Nokton 50mm 1.1 wide open. It is great fun! And the results are often beautiful.

    Not everyone stops down to f11 and not every low light lens is used only in low light.

  10. #80

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    I've just gotten started in IE film, and after I got my first 2 rolls of IE from Efke, I was very impressed with what I saw. Now I hear that it might be cancelled as well. At least Ilford is looking closer into producing an IE film. Hopefully the reports will come back positive. I won't be buying cases of the stuff, but now that I have seen it, I'm hooked.


    I have to admit that I am not as upset over the papers since the only paper I have ever tried was the Ilford MGIV RC paper, when I was developing my own pictures in beginning photography. Eventually, I want to set up a dark room in my home and start to develop pictures again.

    Here's hoping that Ilford can make it profitably.



 

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