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  1. #171

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    SILVERMAX in SILVERMAX Developer characteristic curve:

    http://www.adox.de/english/ADOX%20Fi...MAX_index.html

  2. #172
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    ^So what does it mean? I've never understood how to read these charts?
    Andy

  3. #173
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    The chart says lists zone exposure in its x-axis and film density in its y-axis. This means if you expose a section of this film at zone 8, you can expect a density of 1.29 over b+f, assuming of course, that you develop exactly like it was done when this chart was made. So what is zone 8? It appears to be 7 stops above the light density which creates about 0.1 density over b+f.

    What do I read from this chart? From zone 1 to zone 9 this film has more or less a straight curve which then flattens considerably. Either a compensating film developer was used for this chart, or the film uses DIR couplers to achieve its 14 stop range, or both.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  4. #174

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    Quote Originally Posted by thomas l View Post
    Rollei RPX and Kentmere Films are the same, everybody knows it.
    Hello Thomas,

    no, they are definitely not the same films, but different emulsions. If you compare them directly side by side you will see it. Have you done that? No, you have not.
    Independant developer manufacturers like Wolfgang Moersch ( www.moersch-photochemie.de ) and Heribert Schain from Spur (www.spur-photo.com ) have intensively tested both the two Kentmere and the two RPX films and very clearly say that the emulsions are different (and therefore also different developing times in the Moersch and Spur developers).
    Another friend of mine, Ralf Sänger (you know, the author of several articles in the German print magazine "Schwarzweiss" ) has also tested these films in direct comparison and has confirmed the results from Moersch and Spur that the films are different.

    The RPX films are coated by Harman/Ilfordphoto.
    But as Simon Galley always very clearly has said, they will not offer their original Ilford and Kentmere products to other companies.
    But they do manufacturing for other companies with different products.

    Quote Originally Posted by thomas l View Post
    But Silvermax is really a new film, I already ordered one. I liked Scala very much, so let's see how it will be in Wehner process. The reports are sounding very good
    I've already used this film in the Wehner process and yes, the results are excellent (so are the results of Scala 200X, Foma R100, Agfa Copex Rapid and the Retro 80S in Klaus Wehner's reversal process).
    I've been at Photokina and have talked directly to Mirko Böddecker and Klaus Wehner.
    I will give you further details in a separate Photokina report in the next days. Stay tuned .

    Best regards,
    Henning

  5. #175
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    And here is the Silvermax curve superimposed on the APX 100 curve. It seems almost identical, except for the shadows. But the Silvermax curve isn't complete. It's cut off before the toe, so it's difficult to tell.

    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    SILVERMAX in SILVERMAX Developer characteristic curve:

    http://www.adox.de/english/ADOX%20Fi...MAX_index.html
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Silvermax and APX100.png  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  6. #176

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    Quote Originally Posted by Henning Serger View Post
    I've already used this film in the Wehner process and yes, the results are excellent (so are the results of Scala 200X, Foma R100, Agfa Copex Rapid and the Retro 80S in Klaus Wehner's reversal process).
    I've been at Photokina and have talked directly to Mirko Böddecker and Klaus Wehner.
    I will give you further details in a separate Photokina report in the next days. Stay tuned .

    Best regards,
    Henning
    Hello Henning,
    do you have some samples of your photos online? Would be nice to see how photod from this film look like. How were you able to shoot this film without knowing the curve anyway?

    Looking forward to your Photokina report.

  7. #177

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux View Post
    Hello Henning,
    do you have some samples of your photos online? Would be nice to see how photod from this film look like.
    No sorry, I have no photos online. Well, honestly, I don't think we can really evaluate the characteristics of a film by looking at the pictures online, on computer monitors. It doesn't make much sense.
    To see what the (a) film can deliver you have to look at real prints, or in this case also at the BW positives / slides on a lightbox and in projection.

    Best regards,
    Henning

    P.S. I have some pictures of the Wehner reversal process online (and Scala), but both are with different films, not the Silvermax.

  8. #178

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    Quote Originally Posted by Henning Serger View Post
    No sorry, I have no photos online. Well, honestly, I don't think we can really evaluate the characteristics of a film by looking at the pictures online, on computer monitors. It doesn't make much sense.
    To see what the (a) film can deliver you have to look at real prints, or in this case also at the BW positives / slides on a lightbox and in projection.

    Best regards,
    Henning

    P.S. I have some pictures of the Wehner reversal process online (and Scala), but both are with different films, not the Silvermax.
    But can you send 10,000 sample prints to us for evaluation? I would be happy to receive one.


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  9. #179

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    Quote Originally Posted by Henning Serger View Post
    I don't think we can really evaluate the characteristics of a film by looking at the pictures online, on computer monitors. It doesn't make much sense.
    You also got the Wehner pictures online. It is not good for evaluating, but good enough to get a first impression.
    Would you give me the link to the Wehner pictures? I am very interested.

  10. #180

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux View Post
    You also got the Wehner pictures online. It is not good for evaluating, but good enough to get a first impression.
    Would you give me the link to the Wehner pictures? I am very interested.
    O.k., o.k., you have all won.....
    But really, it is only for a first impression. If I look at these slides on a lighttable and especially in projection, it is a completely different world compared to the very low quality on the computer monitor.

    The following shots are all made on Rollei Retro 80S as an infrared film, using a Heliopan RG 715 filter (this filter blocks light up to 715 nanometer).
    All shots developed by Klaus Wehner in his reversal process (a very sophisticated 20 step process).
    Klaus Wehner has modified his reversal process for Retro 80S a bit for even surpassing the excellent results when using this film as an IR film. So he offers reversal processing of Retro 80S as a normal film, and additionally he offers a slightly modified process for 80S as an IR film ( he is a perfectionist concerning reversal quality).
    The Dmax of his Retro 80S slides is in the 3,80-4,00 logD range.

    Here are some test shots (no art....):

    http://www.high-end-scans.de/img/bil...03_4000ppi.jpg

    http://www.high-end-scans.de/img/bil...04_4000ppi.jpg

    http://www.high-end-scans.de/img/bil...05_4000ppi.jpg

    And here two shots which I have with full intent underexposed to get a "moonshine effect":

    http://www.high-end-scans.de/img/bil...01_4000ppi.jpg

    http://www.high-end-scans.de/img/bil...02_4000ppi.jpg

    I am using Retro 80S and Superpan 200 for years now as infrared films with a Heliopan RG 715 filter. The results have always been excellent (the IR sensivity is on the same level as the Rollei IR film). I've always got an excellent Wood effect with brillant white with the foliage. The characteristic curve of these films is flattening a bit in the highlight zones (VII - X). Therefore you can even intensify the Wood effect by a light overexposure (and without 'burned highlights') to get an even more brillant white if you want that.
    BW infrared slides look outstanding in projection. The brillant white of the foliage is really shining. It is impossible to get that stunning look with prints. As much as I love making my own prints in my darkroom, but with BW IR I prefer BW reversal, it is a league of its own.

    Best regards,
    Henning

    P.S. Thanks to Dominique Ventzke for making the scans.



 

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