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  1. #21

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    Kodak's assets are being undervalued, largely because the popular culture has fallen in love with all things digital. Witness the swoon over Apple products and the respect shown to Bill Gates. But what they've done is very much the same as Kodak's accomplishments: they have developed a huge bank of technological inventions which support the production of new, high quality consumer products. In the popular mind Kodak is viewed as the "telegraph" to digital photography's new-fangled "telephone". So the powers that be consign chemical imaging to the ash heap of history. But this is only because no one sees the chemistry involved in producing a digital image. Digital cameras are just glorified Autochromes which use a silicon light sensor instead of a silver emulsion. The photo-lithography used to produce both the screen that captures the image and the screen which displays it is well within the skill of an old school photo engineer; it is just a paradigm shift to think in terms of electrons moving through circuits, rather than electrons being transferred to molecules and producing oxidation products.

  2. #22

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    Consumers don't get hung up on the technologies used.

    When I was making imaging technology presentations for Kodak (in the late '80s and early '90s) I used to tell people, "technology becomes a success when it becomes transparent to the user. You don't how to know how an automobile engine works to drive a car."

    Some time around 2000, the technology became transparent and consumers started going digital for the CONVENIENCE and RESULTS, and NOT for the technology.

  3. #23
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Hand Antonio Perez a pink slip

    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    My vote is for PE to take the job.
    What? We're going to drug PE and trick him? I didn't think we were that cruel.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  4. #24
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    Some time around 2000, the technology became transparent and consumers started going digital for the CONVENIENCE and RESULTS, and NOT for the technology.
    Let's be clear here. For the marketing-driven perception of convenience and results.

    Marketing is like religion. If done correctly, the subject ends up believing in the truth of what they are told without ever questioning, or having any proof of, it's validity. By definition that's what faith is. Belief without proof.

    They were told digital was easier and better by people who wanted to sell them that perception. The vehicle of those perceptions was irrelevant. This time around it just happened to be digital cameras. In years past it was microwave ovens because fire had become obsolete. So it's no surprise that then became the commonly quoted wisdom. And camera-puchasing pattern.

    If the marketers had told them that colored pencils and sketchpads were the wave of the future, that their core inner self-validations rested on them making pictures using this new analog technology, then we'd be overrun by hipsters sitting on park benchs sketching the ducks on the pond. And being convinced to replace their colored pencils with new and improved upgrades every other day.

    One of the benchmarks of a life well-lived is to finally reach the point of not getting fooled over and over and over, again...

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  5. #25
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    What? We're going to drug PE and trick him? I didn't think we were that cruel.
    I wondered why my coffee tasted funny. It made me dizzy too, so I dumped it. Good thing! Thanks Michael for the warning. I'll be more alert.

    Ask Fred if he wants the job.

    PE

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Let's be clear here. For the marketing-driven perception of convenience and results.
    Sorry, but the convenience and results in going to dcams are what drove the large scale consumers switch, NOT marketing-driven perception of convenience and results. The results and convenience are REAL. Particularly the IMMEDIACY part of 'convenience'. I spent 7 years working on Kodak's instant system; a lot of that time involved looking at customer surveys and customer feedback. The biggest item that drove instant sales (both Kodak and Polaroid) was IMMEDIACY; the ability to share the images almost instantly. I've spent a lot of time looking at photos coming out of photofinishing processors, and it was quite common to see a roll of film that had pictures from 2 (or more) different year's Christmasses on it. Instant, and now digital, give CONSUMERS immediacy that film doesn't offer (even with minilabs) and that's what sells!

    I recognize that the above comments don't apply to the members of this forum, who, first and formost, care about the imaging technology.



    To put my comment about convenience and results in an APUG approved context: George Eastman's 'You push the button, we do the rest' cameras made the underlying silver halide process completely transparent to the user, giving the user convenience and results.
    Last edited by Prof_Pixel; 09-16-2012 at 06:18 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #27
    lxdude's Avatar
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    I really don't think Perez should be handed a pink slip.

    He should find out he's been fired through the news, followed by a call telling him not to come in and that his personal stuff will be boxed and sent to him.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  8. #28
    lxdude's Avatar
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    I got disgusted with the guy when I found out he was was taking vacations on the company jet, paid for by the company, at a time when people were being laid off by the thousands. When I read that he wants a bonus for taking Kodak through bankruptcy, I was appalled.

    If I were an investor, I'd expect him to feel a sense of responsibility for what was happening and show some leadership by giving up his perks, skipping vacation to be there in such difficult times, and not expect to be paid for failure. I would have no faith in him any more, based on his behavior. It is not the behavior of a leader. It is an example of the increasingly common CEO-think: I've gotta get mine, regardless.

    Bonuses are supposed to be incentives and rewards. Retention bonuses make sense for lower management who are not to blame for what has happened, but whose abilities are needed. Reward bonuses are tied to financial performance, so he should be getting his pay docked if anything.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  9. #29
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Underlined of mine.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    The biggest item that drove instant sales (both Kodak and Polaroid) was IMMEDIACY; the ability to share the images almost instantly. I've spent a lot of time looking at photos coming out of photofinishing processors, and it was quite common to see a roll of film that had pictures from 2 (or more) different year's Christmasses on it.
    It also gave them privacy.

    According to someone, the possibility to take home nude or even homemade porn photography was one of the drivers of the Polaroid success.
    You couldn't do that with pictures you had to bring to the shop and get them back. I bet they were Christmases...

    There are a lot of "private" images on hard disks I bet all over the world (especially the more puritan countries).

    I have the impression this thing is overlooked, undertalked, but it could just have been an enormous driver in the advent of digital. The fact that you don't have to show your pictures to your shopkeeper (and hence to the entire district) is just huge. It's not just nude or porn, is anything private in nature (like your child's poo to send to your brothers, mentioned in another thread, or children nudity, or whatever else).
    Last edited by Diapositivo; 09-17-2012 at 06:48 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #30
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Hand Antonio Perez a pink slip

    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    I got disgusted with the guy when I found out he was was taking vacations on the company jet, paid for by the company, at a time when people were being laid off by the thousands. When I read that he wants a bonus for taking Kodak through bankruptcy, I was appalled.

    If I were an investor, I'd expect him to feel a sense of responsibility for what was happening and show some leadership by giving up his perks, skipping vacation to be there in such difficult times, and not expect to be paid for failure. I would have no faith in him any more, based on his behavior. It is not the behavior of a leader. It is an example of the increasingly common CEO-think: I've gotta get mine, regardless.

    Bonuses are supposed to be incentives and rewards. Retention bonuses make sense for lower management who are not to blame for what has happened, but whose abilities are needed. Reward bonuses are tied to financial performance, so he should be getting his pay docked if anything.
    Amen brother. I continue to use their products because of my sympathy for the guys and gals that make the stuff, hoping that my small contribution will help them somehow. If it ends up going into Perez' pockets I will stop and go all Ilford instead. What an a$$ he is.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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