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  1. #11

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    You might call it offspring, depending on where You stand.
    FilmoTec GmbH manufacture reduced range of ORWO products. Not full scale like in the old days but ORWO is not dead, not even close.
    They also manufacture products for others.

  2. #12
    AgX
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    ORWO once had about 14,000 employees and Filmotec has about 25. (Just to give the uninitiated reader a hint at the proportions.)

    This is not directed against Filmotec at all, but I know Filmotec very well and they themselves call them offspring.

    And in my remark "It is not all doomsday" I refered to the Adox enterprise. This was intended to be also read as standing for all the small enterprises which now mingle with the big ones.
    Last edited by AgX; 11-24-2012 at 08:20 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    ORWO once had about 14,000 employees and Filmotec has about 25...
    25 are enough in order to keep the flame alive.
    Wait to see how many will be left at Kodak in about a year from now.
    Scaling down., such are the times.

  4. #14
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    I think that Kodak bankrupcy is not related to drop of film sales but to its poor management.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertoMiglioli View Post
    I think that Kodak bankrupcy is not related to drop of film sales but to its poor management.
    The point was, there are less folks working at Kodak today compared to.., say 10 years ago and it might get worse before it gets better.
    It might be poor management or just business as usual.

  6. #16
    AgX
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    The bancrupsy of Kodak might not be related to film salea, the shrinking of their plants well. Kodak Park partially has turned into parking lots.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    ORWO once had about 14,000 employees and Filmotec has about 25. (Just to give the uninitiated reader a hint at the proportions.)
    Yes, but from these 14,000 at the whole factory complex in Wolfen about 6,000 had worked in the film production directly.
    The others worked in the different huge parts of this factory complex, in the cellulose, gelatin and fiber production, and in the power plant.
    Nevertheless, the film production plant there has been the biggest in Europe for a long time, and the second biggest worldwide. Only Kodak in Rochester has been bigger.
    The whole area in Wolfen was gigantic, bigger than lots of smaller cities.
    I've just recently been there and visited it. Very impressive.

    The oldest film production building is still standing: In it now there is the excellent "Industrie- und Filmmuseum Wolfen" http://www.ifm-wolfen.de/.
    With the original machinery exhibited there you can explore the whole film production process, from production of the film base, emulsion making, coating and all the converting steps up to the finished product. The excellent guides explain all production steps in detail.
    And there you can see the original coating machine from 1936, on which the first Agfacolor color film was made.
    By the way, this machine run until 1989 (!!). But not as a color film coating machine, but for test and correction coatings.

    I can highly recommend a visit of this unique museum. Extremely interesting!

    Best regards,
    Henning

  8. #18
    AgX
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    About figures: Power, cellulose and gelatin are of course part of film production if done in-house. Furthermore part of emulsion-elements production was done in former Agfa dyestuff sister-plant, whereas competitors did such on own plant. With re-structuring after WWII this all got complicated figure-wise. There even was a legal case on such figures.


    Furthermore the size of a company even aside of the production in question can be very important as this may give the company buffer capacities research-, production- and finance-wise.
    However the comparison between a small and a huge company is very difficult as many factors go into that.
    Last edited by AgX; 11-25-2012 at 07:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    About figures: Power, cellulose and gelatin are of course part of film production if done in-house.
    That is of course right (except the huge fiber production there for making clothes). But for modern, economic film production it is unusual to do all in-house, with a complete "Fertigungstiefe".
    That they have all done by themselves was one of their major economic problems. Much too high costs.

    Best regards,
    Henning

  10. #20
    AgX
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    One of those issues was less the in-house production of basic materials but the surrounding apparatus which served their facilities.
    However, this is a perspective centralized onto the plant, a western approach. Lots of services such a plant offered where spared from the community. So from a socialistic, or community based, perspective a different image arises.
    This issue typically is overlooked when productivity of such plants is examined, be it by consultants or competitors.

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