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  1. #11
    kb3lms's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, I feel Fuji is now stuck with E6 film and Kodak may have made the wiser, but unpopular, choice. Kodak produces a small variety of color negative films but Fuji much less so, rather concentrating on the E6 market. Digital has all but eaten reversal film. CN film may have a much longer life due to it's better latitude. Obviously, we would all wish none of the manufacturers had cut anything. I haven't been a slide film shooter for a long time but I don't like to see anyone lose the materials they like.

    It seems hard to believe a bottom has not been found by this point. The general public (aka soccer moms) haven't used film in years and even digbibal P&S units have mostly given way to cell phones. Few SM's use anything but phones any longer.

    If is wasn't so sad, it's almost humorous to note that 10 to 15 years ago, the silver halide imaging market was at the top of it's game and today so few people really even recall it. This past weekend I spotted my first film camera in the wild in years, other than mine, of course. It was a disposable, but it was film.

    -- Jason
    All this has happened before, and all this will happen again.

  2. #12

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    Was that film demand overall i.e total film sales are down or simply that Fuji film sales are down?

    I wonder what the trend for Ilford film sales are? Of the three major film makers only Ilford seem to have made a commitment to be "last man standing" so its Ilford's fortunes that maybe needs to concern us the most.

    pentaxuser

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by jp498 View Post
    I'd bet e6 demand is still decreasing. It's more apt to be replaced by digital than B&W. Few places develop it. It's harder to develop at home than B&W.
    For the first time ever, I'm starting to think that E6 isn't worth the cost and hassle of trying to get it processed. I dont't think there is any service now in the UK which allows you to buy a prepaid mailer at a reasonable price (now that Jessops have finished....anyone like a few mailers which are no longer valid!), and postage is a killer. I process my own E6 sometimes, but when supplies of slide film in my freezer are exhausted, that will be that so far as I'm concerned.

  4. #14

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    I think the future of reversal/slide film will follow the Agfa/Rollei model of making a color film on a clear base with no orange mask that can be processed as a negative or a transparency.

    The orange mask is not needed anymore since all color photos are digitally scanned and printed now. And the handful of people or labs that print CN optically is irrelevant.

    I expect to see a future offering from Fujifilm or Kodak that accommodates both methods.
    Last edited by wblynch; 03-25-2013 at 02:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    - Bill Lynch

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    B/W I think has more traction with the Holga and Lomography crowd
    Don't agree. I think the most committed colour shooters are the Lomo crowd. They tend not to shoot black and white at all from what I see, but convert afterwards.
    I think the majority of people shooting 'pro' black and white films, only shoot black and white.

    I'd like to see an APUG poll on 'who shoots colour neg consistently'. It probably wouldn't be double figures.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kb3lms View Post

    If is wasn't so sad, it's almost humorous to note that 10 to 15 years ago, the silver halide imaging market was at the top of it's game and today so few people really even recall it. This past weekend I spotted my first film camera in the wild in years, other than mine, of course. It was a disposable, but it was film.

    -- Jason
    There was a cycling racing event here in the past weekend. Went to the teams' concentration and saw 2 film cameras! A middle aged man carrying a silver EOS and a younger man (30s) with a nikon (F4 perhaps).
    The mainstream market has shifted to smartphones. You get to see more people shooting with phones than compacts in some occasions.

    Something I'd love to do is shoot medium format slides... 6x7 or 6x9. But given my very thrifty student situation, that won't be possible for a while.

  7. #17
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    I think the economy may have a roll in this as well. Even if the film market were stable, raw materials are costing more. We've seen steady price increases for almost everything for quite some time.
    Truzi

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Was that film demand overall i.e total film sales are down or simply that Fuji film sales are down?

    I wonder what the trend for Ilford film sales are? Of the three major film makers only Ilford seem to have made a commitment to be "last man standing" so its Ilford's fortunes that maybe needs to concern us the most.

    pentaxuser
    Fujifilm consistently states that they will be with film to the very end. The problem is, the end is not pretty, what with one or two different films left. It's the long long slow slide to the end that is seemingly unable to be stopped.

    At least at this point no films are being discontinued.

    WHEN will the bottom be reached in the film market?

  9. #19

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    It's a bit off-topic but the following arrived in my inbox this morning from PMA:

    "April 30th 2013 marks the twenty fifth anniversary of the opening of World Expo 88 in Brisbane, Queensland. The event ran for six months from 30th April until 30th October 1988.

    An Expo is a world's fair, where nations and corporations gather together to review and predict our cultural and technological evolution through exhibitions and demonstrations of their achievement.

    The 600 million plus event was fully sanctioned by the bureau of International Expositions based in Paris, and ran with the theme 'leisure in the Age of technology".

    World Expo 88 was sread over 40 hectares on the South bank of the Brisbane River, within 800 meters of the CBD. The total attendance for the six-month event was 15,760,000

    Hanimex - Fuji as the official suppliers of Film and Cameras to World Expo 88 were responsible for the set up and running of three (3) on site one hour minilabs as well as the photographic media centre.

    The onsite official media centre was set up for use by accredited photographers for the duration of World Expo 88. On site processing and printing of black & white and C-41 compatible color negatives was available, while E-6 was processed off site by F-Stop Color Laboratory via regular courier runs organized by the media centre.

    Black & white processing and printing was handled at no charge with C-41 and E-6 services made available at tax-free prices. A full range of color and black & white film (as long as it was Fuji) was also available at the sales and service counter.

    The Hanimex -Fuji minilabs were operational from 30.04.1988 to 30.10.1988 a total of 184 working days, during this time three minilabs processed in excess of 74.000 rolls. The hours of operation were 10:00 to 22:00 (these hours were laid down as part of the agreement with World Expo 88 and could not be altered.

    Each outlet (with the exception of the Media Centre) was very small - only16m2. In this space room was made to fit film and paper processors, counters, two cash registers, paper/chemistry, stock,drums for photographic effluent and the most important ingredient up to five (5) staff members at any one time.

    Of the three on site minilabs one K420 handled almost 60% (44,000) of all rolls processed and sold in excess of 100,000 rolls of films.

    World Expo 88 saw the introduction of the Fuji Quicksnap with over 5000 processed in around three (3) months.

    Some interesting numbers from World Expo 88

    80 - the percentage of rolls that were 100 iso
    61 - the percentage of rolls that were 24exp
    74 - the percentage of customers that could either load or unload film from 135mm cameras.
    300,000 - the number of season passes sold all bearing the message "Image by Fuji Film
    0.8 - the percentage of sales that required a credit card transaction
    7 - the percentage of rolls processed with a second set of prints
    22.6 - the average number of frames per film
    2.4 the percentage of reversal rolls processed
    1.3 the percentage of rolls that were blank
    We processed 118.5 klms of film and produced enough 4" x 6" prints to cover the Sydney Opera House more than twice."


    The 1988 Expo was small in comparison to others that have been held but the Australian population in that year was just 16.5 million so Fuji did very well with 3 minilabs. They were the days. OzJohn

  10. #20
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OzJohn View Post
    74 - the percentage of customers that could either load or unload film from 135mm cameras.
    0.8 - the percentage of sales that required a credit card transaction
    Wow, 26% of camera users couldn't even load/unload their own film? Maybe that translates to today, in some way like 90% of users don't know how to shoot RAW?

    0.8% used a credit card, so what 10% BankCard, 20% Cheque, 69.2% Cash? That'd be a small kiosk worth robbing...

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