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  1. #11
    horacekenneth's Avatar
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    If you think about it we're still in the early years of digital. There's no saying what kind of relationship the photography market will have with film in the future. It still very well could find its own place (beyond being a retro fad).

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by horacekenneth View Post
    If you think about it we're still in the early years of digital. There's no saying what kind of relationship the photography market will have with film in the future. It still very well could find its own place (beyond being a retro fad).
    It still has it's own place. It's not the film users that need to find it rather a digital world to accept it, wquite different.

    Ian

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by arealitystudios View Post
    3) As film cameras get older and older it is becoming harder and harder to find examples that have not been beat to hell and are in good working order.
    ...especially with the more recent electronic cameras. In my experience, when a Canonet or Hi-Matic dies, it dies *dead*; it's not like a 1970s SLR that still gives you manual exposure if the meter fails, or an older all-manual camera that can be repaired with reasonable effort---the repair exceeds the value of the camera if it's possible at all. So every failure diminishes the available pool.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  4. #14

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    It seems to me that certain cameras have been dubbed "legendary" (whether they deserve that or not) and the repeated praise by people (some of whom seem to just be repeating what they have heard rather than speaking form experience) has cause the prices to climb. Whether they will ever go back down or not, IDK.

    Interestingly, for one of the cameras mentioned in the OP I think I keep seeing the same carea(s) being bought, used, and re-sold at higher prices over-and-over again. No matter how much they seller says they liked it but need the money to (insert whatever situation sounds imminent/pathetic) I read that more as sales hype than honest rationale... based on my less-than-satisfactory experience with similar/same cameras.


    But another phenomenon also may be in play. I've noticed that whatever I want all of the sudden goes up in prioce immediately before I'm ready to buy.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    I've been accumulating equipment for about 4 years, and yes, prices have gone up. I think the ridiculously low prices of a few years ago were the result of the recession combining with the rush to digital to force more equipment on the market and suppressed buying. The recession is over and it appears that those who need and/or want to dump film equipment have already done so.
    +1. I think, too, that many out there are coming to the realization that film cameras are no longer being made in the quantities, or in the varieties, of years past, influencing the expectations of both sellers and buyers. Nikon, Canon and others have sharply curtained their offerings over the last several years. An increasing scarcity can be seen in evidence - most notably, I would suggest - in the "pro end" of the market. To wit: two and a half years ago (give or take), I picked up several F3HP bodies, on ebay, in ex/ex+ condition (in "KEHese"), prices in the $75 - $100 range; drives for the same were typically $20-$45. Around the same time, I also purchased several F2/F2 Photomic/F2A bodies at prices in the same range. A quick look on ebay this am finds prices, for the most part, for the various models of both the F2 and F3 bodies, have more or less doubled. With few exceptions, most of bodies with initial bids of sub-$100 look pretty sketchy. It has become quite common to see F3HP bodies, for example, selling on "the bay" for several hundred dollars! While economic factors and the rush to digital may explain a large part of the changes in pricing, a shrinkage in available product also is part of the calculus. I would only expect prices to continue their upward climb...
    An assortment of F-series Nikons (F to F6, excluding the F4) with quite a few Nikkors, a pair of M6s with some Leitz glass, a pair of 500c/ms with a wide range of Zeiss optics and, just to help keep Duracell solvent, a D800.

    Favourite films: (1). KE ("Kodachrome Era"): 35mm: PKM25 and PKR64, HP5/Tri-X; 120: PKR64, PanF, FP4. (2). PKE ("Post-Kodachrome Era"): (a) 35mm: E100G, HP5 Plus/Tri-X and Delta 3200; (b) 120: E100G, PanF Plus, FP4 Plus, TMax 100.

  6. #16

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    I've been hoarding Olympus Stylus Epics for about a year. I've got 12 of them stored in shoe box as backups with 2 more in active everyday use. My rule is to spend less than $40 each (although the average price is fast approaching $100) -- you can still find a cheaper model if you keep your eyes peeled.

  7. #17
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    In my experience, when a Canonet or Hi-Matic dies, it dies *dead*;
    Many if the cameras from this era suffer from having been assembled with acid core solder. I have fixed more than one Hi-Matic and a very nice Konica by removing the bottom plate and re-soldering the battery leads.

    Just sayin'

  8. #18
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    My RB67 equipment is so cheap I don't even worry about leaving it in the trunk of the car when I park anywhere. I use to insure the equipment. It will never come back to the prices I paid years ago. That breaks my heart.

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noacronym View Post
    So, the rampant inflation is hitting the old camera market now, huh? That's all it is--just inflation. Cameras can only be worth LESS, because film is getting scarce as sharks teeth in Kansas.
    Just as an experiment, I just went over to B & H's website and randomly added over 350 rolls of 120 Kodak film to my shopping cart.

    My cart includes seven different films - B & W negative film, colour negative film and colour slide film.

    I can get it shipped to my address in Washington State in 5 business days for about $38.00.

    It will cost me about $2,200.00 if I complete the purchase , but in no way is it difficult, or even particularly inconvenient for me to obtain the film.

    I can obtain almost all of the same film from local stores (all of it, if you consider Glazer's in Seattle as local), but it will take some driving around, and will cost me more.

    Film isn't scarce, it is just a specialist material.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by noacronym View Post
    So, the rampant inflation is hitting the old camera market now, huh? That's all it is--just inflation. Cameras can only be worth LESS, because film is getting scarce as sharks teeth in Kansas.
    "Rampant inflation" means 2%? Man, you must not have been alive in the 1970s.

    Actually, it'd be sort of interesting to index the resale prices of some "standard" cameras against inflation over the last few decades. I don't have the information at my fingertips but I bet somebody does.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

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