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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Klainmeister View Post
    I think archival, in the end, will win. It's much easier to store a reel of film than some sort of digital copy over the longhaul.
    I was talking with a technologist at Disney, where they are archiving by digitally generating a colour separation, then printing to B&W film - but this is not enough film to keep the industry afloat. When films were distributed as film rather than bits, tens of thousands of copies of the film would be made, now for archival purposes it will be a handful.

  2. #12
    AgX
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    3 colour seperation copies per movie cannot compensate for hundreds of release copies.

  3. #13

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    Most (perhaps all-- not 100 certain) major studios still make prints of all theatrical releases (including those entirely shot digitally) for archival purposes. That's really what these deals are about. However, release prints are drying up fast-- I work in film distribution, and a lot of art theaters around the country are being denied requests for classic titles because such-and-such studio doesn't ship prints anymore. They tell them to screen a blu-ray instead.

    Regardless, film (color and black and white) will be around for a long time, even if Kodak does totally collapse. However, prices will continue to go up...

  4. #14

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    There will always be enough demand for film to keep some coating plant of some size operating at a profit. Kodak's size is the problem, not their product. Prices will perhaps go up although I don't know enough to know if that is unlimited. I think film prices will stabilize at the point where X's customers move to digital. So there they sit; making a certain amount of profit and employing a certain number of people: A nice little business to be in. A boutique business, like Leica perhaps. The scale is critical. It might just end up being a couple suppliers with neither of them being Kodak or Ilford.

    Nobody here really knows how much film is being sold and nobody here (except for a few) knows how much film one needs to sell to keep a plant of size X running. Everyone is just talking through their hats.
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

  5. #15
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Nice to hear something positive for a change.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by semi-ambivalent View Post
    There will always be enough demand for film to keep some coating plant of some size operating at a profit. Kodak's size is the problem, not their product. Prices will perhaps go up although I don't know enough to know if that is unlimited. I think film prices will stabilize at the point where X's customers move to digital. So there they sit; making a certain amount of profit and employing a certain number of people: A nice little business to be in. A boutique business, like Leica perhaps. The scale is critical. It might just end up being a couple suppliers with neither of them being Kodak or Ilford.

    Nobody here really knows how much film is being sold and nobody here (except for a few) knows how much film one needs to sell to keep a plant of size X running. Everyone is just talking through their hats.
    thanks s-a

    you said exactly what i was thinking !
    not to mention, i sure hope kodak secured the movie studios,
    they are ONE OF THE only ones making the film since fuji stopped ...

    - john
    Last edited by jnanian; 06-07-2013 at 06:45 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spreading disinformation, sorry :(
    im empty, good luck

  7. #17
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    What about the digital cinema percentage in India and China plus south Asian countries and Turkistan ? How is the american cinema overthere ?
    Or do they use cd player and tv ?

  8. #18
    AgX
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    In some of those film has vanished.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    What about the digital cinema percentage in India and China plus south Asian countries and Turkistan ? How is the american cinema overthere ?
    Or do they use cd player and tv ?
    I believe the spread of digital exhibition in Asia is largely the cause for Fuji to pull out of motion picture production. Fuji stock was never very popular in the U.S., but used widely East Asia. Now, very little there is shot or exhibited on film, as I understand it.

    Also, significantly, major film festivals are almost exclusively digital now. With low commercial demand for prints, for many smaller titles they are never even struck, whereas before at least a quantity would be needed for the festival circuit. Once peoples hard drives start crashing, some films will begin to disappear. I've heard it theorized that the period we are in now could be like the silent era, with only 20-30% of produced pictures surviving past 50 years.

  10. #20

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    Perez must be one unhappy man at the moment: Kodak is still alive.

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