Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,846   Posts: 1,582,715   Online: 928
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 39
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,802
    Again, this is related to motion pictures. As far as much still photography is concerned, estar is far superior to actetate. It's stronger, dimensionally stable, and resists age and handling better. Most 120 film is thin acetate. Most sheet films are polyester (I wish they all were).

  2. #22
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,531
    Images
    65
    Not all substitute components were created equal. So, you have to do R&D to find out if they match what you are currently using. This takes money and trained staff. These are things that Kodak has been losing quite a bit of nowdays.

    Therefore, I think that there will be the possibility for a decline in quality. Just MHO.

    PE

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Enroute
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,004
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Not all substitute components were created equal. So, you have to do R&D to find out if they match what you are currently using. This takes money and trained staff. These are things that Kodak has been losing quite a bit of nowdays.

    Therefore, I think that there will be the possibility for a decline in quality. Just MHO.
    In just roll film or sheet too..?

    Tmax 100 & 400 in 4x5 is about the best base material I have ever encountered, even if the smooth emulsion of 100 plays havoc on AN glass carriers...
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  4. #24
    Hexavalent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    550
    Blog Entries
    3
    http://wwwca.kodak.com/global/en/pro...f32/f32f.jhtml

    EDIT: Link is to the t-max data sheet showing which formats are on acetate vs. Estar.
    Last edited by Hexavalent; 06-12-2013 at 09:18 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added description
    - Ian

  5. #25
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,531
    Images
    65
    Yes Ian, you have the data and it is stated in the OP.

    PE

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    San Clemente, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,129
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    ...Therefore, I think that there will be the possibility for a decline in quality...
    Quote Originally Posted by PKM-25 View Post
    In just roll film or sheet too..?...
    I just checked the data sheets for EKTAR, PORTRA 160 and PORTRA 400. All three say sheet sizes are on ESTAR (polyester) base. TMAX 100 and TMAX 400 as well as TRI-X sheets are also on ESTAR bases. So, for the time being, Ron's speculation applies to roll film only, at least as far as acetate outsourcing is concerned.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,083
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Not all substitute components were created equal. So, you have to do R&D to find out if they match what you are currently using. This takes money and trained staff. These are things that Kodak has been losing quite a bit of nowdays.

    Therefore, I think that there will be the possibility for a decline in quality. Just MHO.

    PE
    Terrific.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Enroute
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,004
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Terrific.
    One day at a time sir, Kodak says they have years worth of the current acetate, since they are high on quality, this will hopefully give them enough time to source out good material...
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    South Carolina, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    127
    Pet film base is much more archival. For my purposes of documentation I favor it over the acetate base. For all formats 35, 120 and sheet film, I might add.

  10. #30
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    If PET didn't have the light-piping issues I'd much rather use it over an acetate base any day of the week. I am not concerned with jamming cameras with it, so that's not an issue for me. But polyesters have a very long life-time. However, if PET for all roll films meant having to screw with some kind of REMJET layer, then know, I'd rather use acetate.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin