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  1. #31
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    Movie Projection started using Polyester in the 1950 era, and it is needed to support the "Platter Drives" that hold enough film to run fro a couple of hours at 90 feet a minute. The prints are spliced together with Tape, as you cannot cement splice polyester. Movie polyester is thinner than acetate, to exhibit the same stiffness. Light piping is not a problem as the print stock is used in the labs and so is loaded in the darkroom. Projectors have been set up with shear pins and such to avoid broken parts.

    Movie Camera neg is GENERALLY on acetate. before digital intermediate, the camera negative was cut and spliced in the editing shop. Things like IMAX Require the strength of Poly in the Camera.

    Still 35mm film is generally acetate, but things like tech pan for instance have been Poly. The last of the EFKE film was on poly. The Agfa aviphot stock is all poly. (Rollei/Maco) The short lived Ilford HP5 Motorwinder film was on poly.

    Poly can be curtly, attract Static, light pipe and is almost impossible to tear by hand. Often the are are Back Coatings and grey dyes used to minimize this problem. Sheet film is often made on Poly for the extra stiffness.

    Poly will not get vinegar syndrome.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  2. #32
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    Also, while polyester may not be tearable (I don't tear my film anyway) it is easily cut with scissors. Kodak 2485 is also an ESTAR based film, as most of the surveillance stocks are.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  3. #33
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Rem-jet is not an issue here. And "years" of inventory. That is insane!

  4. #34
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Rem-jet is not an issue here. And "years" of inventory. That is insane!
    "Years", that's what Kodak says...

  5. #35
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    You can make your bulletproof Windows from Kodak film with this new Polyester thing.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    You can make your bulletproof Windows from Kodak film with this new Polyester thing.
    And now we know the kind of life you're living ^^ haha


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #37

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    When was the last time Kodak actually used the words 'still photography' in one of their statements?
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  8. #38
    AgX
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    As long as they still use "photography" at all...

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    ... Movie Camera neg is GENERALLY on acetate. before digital intermediate, the camera negative was cut and spliced in the editing shop. Things like IMAX Require the strength of Poly in the Camera. ...
    I remember that when DuPont was still making movie stock, they put their negative and reversal materials on their (patented) polyester Cronar base. This was a different material than Estar, and it was less subject to light piping. The point is that it can be done and was done on a commercial scale quite successfully. Whether that is in store for future film is a question.

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