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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    Assuming that because silver prices are down 20% that film prices will also reduce is rather ingenuous it's more likely to increase the film companys profits, and their share holders dividends.
    Any time costs of materials goes down for Kodak (or Ilford, for that matter), I think it's a good thing. The rich are getting richer but I refuse to see a bogeyman behind every tree. It's self-limiting.
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

  2. #12
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    I thought Silver was bought and sold on the Futures indices.

  3. #13
    AgX
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    The problem with silver is that its price-evolution is even less predicitable as with other raw materials.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by semi-ambivalent View Post
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-0...mmodities.html

    I wonder how far out the film companies buy.
    s-a
    I would bet that they don't physically buy much in advance at all. However, I'm sure they hedge with futures contracts and other vehicles.

    Which will moderate the impact of both increases and decreases in commodity prices.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  5. #15
    AgX
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    Hedging on raw material has been done.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertratt View Post
    Well, it is all too complicated for my poor brain. I think a lot of factors will determine if film prices go up or down and the price of silver is only one of those. If the Chinese stop exporting rare earth metals to Japan, the US and the European Union, like they say they might, then fancy-dancy electronic thingamabobs will skyrocket in price and people will dust off the old film cameras because gigetal-digiaal cameras are too expensive.
    Or those fancy-dancy thingamabobs will be made only in China.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  7. #17
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    I can't think of one instance in the 61 years I've been involved in photography when the price of film has gone down, so don't hold you're breath folks.
    Ben

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertratt View Post
    Well, it is all too complicated for my poor brain. I think a lot of factors will determine if film prices go up or down and the price of silver is only one of those. If the Chinese stop exporting rare earth metals to Japan, the US and the European Union, like they say they might, then fancy-dancy electronic thingamabobs will skyrocket in price and people will dust off the old film cameras because gigetal-digiaal cameras are too expensive.
    From what I remember the Chinese threatened to cut back exports. But it seems that I also remember some huge supply being found off the shore of Japan. Now it's all about mining it. There was also some other news about another huge supply being found somewhere else outside China.

    Silver on sale, 28% off; Maybe I'll buy more.
    W.A. Crider

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertratt View Post
    Well, it is all too complicated for my poor brain. I think a lot of factors will determine if film prices go up or down and the price of silver is only one of those. If the Chinese stop exporting rare earth metals to Japan, the US and the European Union, like they say they might, then fancy-dancy electronic thingamabobs will skyrocket in price and people will dust off the old film cameras because gigetal-digiaal cameras are too expensive.
    That's right China is one of the World's only places where rare industrial metals like Neodymium are mined and the Chinese say that in the next ten years as the the Chinese economy develops they will need it all for domestic use and will not be exporting it any more. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neodymium
    Ben

  10. #20
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    Well, it would be nice if the price of AgNO3 would drop a little. Actually, some vendors have dropped prices but they could drop some more.

    However, I'm sure they hedge with futures contracts and other vehicles.
    Back in at least the film heydays of the late 1980's and early 1990's Kodak very actively traded in precious medals futures. They still might today. The wife of a friend I worked with for a number of years worked in that operation at the main headquarters. She once told me that, on paper anyway, Kodak sold almost as much gold and silver as they physically received. They'd sell off stuff bought at higher prices when they would predict that they could buy it back cheaper in the short term future because of some move they thought the market would make. They'd also sell metals bought at lower prices when the price went up and they projected it would drop again. It was quite the sophisticated operation. She'd told us that while they ended up wrong from time to time that overall they saved the company millions of dollars per year in precious metals costs. They also actively traded in various foreign currencies and other unrelated commodities. There were about 75 people working in that operation at the time.
    All this has happened before, and all this will happen again.

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