Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,328   Posts: 1,537,108   Online: 902
      
Page 7 of 57 FirstFirst 1234567891011121317 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 566
  1. #61

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,241
    Images
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by ME Super View Post
    Stone,
    You can increase saturation of slide film (this is true of E-6 as well as it was of Kodachrome) with slight underexposure. By "slight" I mean 1/3 to 1/2 stop.If you go beyond 1 stop then it's just plain underexposed (unless the underexposed look is what you're going for).
    Are you sure this works with scanners though? that might be true of printing it on ilfochrome paper but with scanners, it just means you get a dark image, the scanner can't see through the darker densities...

  2. #62
    cmacd123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Stittsville, Ontario
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,014
    The Old AnscoChrome - GAF film was based on the AGFA technology, rather then the Ektachrome technology. They had their own processing chemicals. so the Storage life was different.

    I do recall a 500ASA version.

    Ferrania -3M film was mostly sold in the private label market. It is intriguing that they claim ot have the equipment to make 127, as EFKE seems to have been the ultimate supplier for many of the 127 films sold in the last while. Somewhere I still have some Dynapan spools from my early pre-high school attempts at film developing. (They are unique as the centre is shiny metal, but the metal flanges are black. 127 was also the "superSlide format, but Slide film has not been available in that size for ages.

    Perhaps they could earn their way to bootstrap there systems by converting other make film to 127, 126 and 110. {that does fit in with the rumours of a lomography connection to this while plan}

    I will not hold my breath of course, but will cross my fingers.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  3. #63
    cmacd123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Stittsville, Ontario
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,014
    Quote Originally Posted by MDR View Post
    I'd say you get more latitude and dynamic range with neg film so neg to neg should be better. Positive films usually have more inherent contrast than negative films meaning they retain less image information that can be reproduced and you already loose a lot of information at the copy/printing stage. Neg low contrast to ultra low contrast Neg (print) pos higher contrast to slightly higher contrast (loss of information).
    Some MUCH Older colour processes did actually use reversal film. About the third or forth version of Technicolour was a single strip camera system. Technicolour had a deal where Kodak provided them Kodachrome stock. they processed it and made B&W separation Negatives, which then were compatible with the rest of the technicolour process from the three strip Technicolour cameras.

    The first system that was used for making 16mm colour movies used Kodachrome camera film, and A special Kodachrome Print stock - both reversal. When ektachrome came out, their was a Special Low contrast 16mm stock called "Ektachrome Commercial" which could be printed on a Kodachrome release print stock.

    The driver was the reversal stocks had smaller grain. Once Eastman Colour Negative got past it's first few versions, the grain was down enough that ECN started to be made available in 16mm Big budget 16mm films could also shoot 35mm and make reduction prints on 16mm stock.

    The Movie Negative films are of lower contrast than the Still colour films. I played with them about 20 years ago. There were some labs who took advantage of the fact that the movie industry often generates "short ends" (part rolls of Movie film of less than 400 ft) and sold them for still use, including making a print on EASTMAN colour print film. Trying to print the negative on regualr colour paper showed the lower contrast, and sure enough the same labs would offer to process regualr C-41 film, and then make slides on ECP. HIGH contrast slides!

    today, scanning is much more the norm, followed by editing as d*g*t*l video and using a Laser film recorder to make a new negative to produce the needed ECP film prints. Here again the latitude of the negative film rules the day, as well as the experienced workers being much more confortable with the materials they are used to using.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  4. #64
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,323
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    436
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Are you sure this works with scanners though? that might be true of printing it on ilfochrome paper but with scanners, it just means you get a dark image, the scanner can't see through the darker densities...
    A scanner can handle a 1/3 to 1/2 stop increase in density just fine. Where it falls down is when you're dealing with gross underexposure (1+ stops). And this is venturing off-topic for APUG.

  5. #65

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,241
    Images
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    The Old AnscoChrome - GAF film was based on the AGFA technology, rather then the Ektachrome technology. They had their own processing chemicals. so the Storage life was different.

    I do recall a 500ASA version.

    Ferrania -3M film was mostly sold in the private label market. It is intriguing that they claim ot have the equipment to make 127, as EFKE seems to have been the ultimate supplier for many of the 127 films sold in the last while. Somewhere I still have some Dynapan spools from my early pre-high school attempts at film developing. (They are unique as the centre is shiny metal, but the metal flanges are black. 127 was also the "superSlide format, but Slide film has not been available in that size for ages.

    Perhaps they could earn their way to bootstrap there systems by converting other make film to 127, 126 and 110. {that does fit in with the rumours of a lomography connection to this while plan}

    I will not hold my breath of course, but will cross my fingers.
    I want to be clear that they said that but I think they are speaking about the same thing that Ilford just did with the ULF run... which is selling a can of uncut 46mm and then you re-roll it yourself... I just asked the rep from ADOX about that and he said they would consider not only making a 46mm can full of one of their new films but also would sell it as a package with backing paper. Again they are only CONSIDERING this... but it's a good start, a maybe is better than a flat out no... ilford said they can't make backing paper in that size so that's why I'm hoping someone else does, so I'm guessing Ferrania probably will do something similar... you can only re-use the backing paper so many times before the edges get all ratty, especially with older cameras...

    However, with the whole Lomography movement, if they are actually the plant for the lomo films, they may actually produce the 127 film with spools and paper together since they have a good market for that stuff, and we could benefit as an after thought LOL

  6. #66

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,254
    Images
    21
    I'll be happy as long as they produce 120. In a world where slide film in the common sheet sizes seems to be on the way out, I have a hard time imagining there's a market for it in the orphan formats---but I'd be glad to be wrong.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  7. #67

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,241
    Images
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    I'll be happy as long as they produce 120. In a world where slide film in the common sheet sizes seems to be on the way out, I have a hard time imagining there's a market for it in the orphan formats---but I'd be glad to be wrong.

    -NT
    I'm worried about that too, one of my main reasons for moving to 4x5 was for the amazing color and quality and wow factor of a 4x5 sheet of Velvia50.... and guess what we just lost... haha

    I'm still kind of surprised that Velvia 100 sold better than Velvia 50, I used that most for landscape work. Strange really ...

  8. #68

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mission Viejo, California
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    1,456
    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    ?.. 127 was also the "superSlide format, but Slide film has not been available in that size for ages...
    Actually Rollei Crossbird is slide film and has been available in 127 for a couple of years now. It's not being packaged any more due to EFKE's collapse but could be again if the machinery resurfaces.

    There is still some in the supply chain if you want it.
    - Bill Lynch

  9. #69

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,241
    Images
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by wblynch View Post
    Actually Rollei Crossbird is slide film and has been available in 127 for a couple of years now. It's not being packaged any more due to EFKE's collapse but could be again if the machinery resurfaces.

    There is still some in the supply chain if you want it.
    Hmm, I didn't know it was available in 127... I also thought it was a cross processed film or something, and wouldn't look good as a real E-6 processed film?

  10. #70

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ringerike, Norway
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    140
    Rollei Crossbird is CR200 (E-6 film) packaged as a C-41 film.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin