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  1. #51
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Don't worry... smartphones will be as archaic and useless as flash powder in a decade or so. The consumer electronics industry survives by
    making everything you want today obsolete tomorrow...
    Instead of wearing some apparatus on the ear, the future 'social media consumer' will wear a 'trend setting' contraption on the eyes (like glasses) that will allow 'image capture' at the blink of an eye and also offer full-time internet browsing.

  2. #52
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    The introduction of digital cameras meant the start of new technology, and the engineers and marketing people at the time could probably not envision what the technology would eventually bring.

    If I take my iPhone and put it on a tripod, use an app that avoids high ISO, maybe even takes multiple exposures and merges them together into a high resolution file, and saves as TIFF as opposed to JPEG, I get better picture quality in a print than my father gets from his two year old Pentax DSLR. It will not compare to a newer DSLR, but it's an interesting comparison.

    Who knows what the future will hold? Everything new we introduce almost always has some kind of consequence nobody could figure out. Those who say smart phones are stupid are probably old and with a generational gap, and simply don't see the possibilities that the devices offer. While I think it's healthy to be skeptical and think critically, and not just take things at face value, it's even more important to try to see things from many different aspects and viewpoints, and not just your own.
    Used with moderation, a smart phone can add tremendous value. You may not like or need those things, in which case it's not for you. But that's not going to be true for others.

    If the engineers in the old days of digital technology didn't see what was coming with camera phones, then who's to say what's to come? Maybe smart phone manufacturers are digging their own graves now, without even realizing it.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Instead of wearing some apparatus on the ear, the future 'social media consumer' will wear a 'trend setting' contraption on the eyes (like glasses) that will allow 'image capture' at the blink of an eye and also offer full-time internet browsing.
    Geek chic (lensless glasses) is only really an accepted style in metropolitan areas. Google Glass probably won't take off universally for that reason - it's a technology for a very specific moment in fashion.

    But the 'blink to snap' idea seems plausible, just maybe not with something as big and clumsy as glasses. I can imagine some kind of small, stick-on wireless transmitter though, in the shape of a tear... It would be called Teari™.

    But christ, we're surely not that far off having our vision recorded with such a device - a tiny sensor that records the reflected light of the cornea?
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  4. #54

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    Human nature includes a certain change-averse instinct, I think; confronted with something new, we all have *some* vestige of that gut-level reaction that says "make it go away". For that instinct's purposes, smartphones are not supposed to be cameras because THAT IS NOT THE WAY IT WAS YESTERDAY!!1! (mutatis mutandis for film vs digital, dry plates vs wet, photography vs painting). And obviously we all have a countervailing tendency to get excited about the new shiny thing, and the way we adapt to changes involves those two instincts kind of fighting it out.

    I actually think that works pretty well, in the big picture; individuals settle at different personal feelings about different kinds of change at different times, and we seem usually to end up on a reasonable middle path between chaos and stasis. All the wailing and gnashing of teeth about new tools displacing old ones (or less-new ones, as in this thread), and the frenzied rush of users to the Next Big Thing, are healthy parts of this process, IMHO. Y'all are part of the cultural immune system of human creativity!

    OK, maybe I got a little carried away. But I think the general idea is sound---we adapt to new things, like pocket-sized Cray-killers[1] that can take pictures of reasonable quality, by freaking out about them in two directions at once and eventually stabilizing.

    Disclaimer: I'm not one of the smartphone manufacturers digging their own graves, but I am in the business of selling them the shovels with which to do it. :-)

    -NT

    [1] Back in about 1988, a friend of mine predicted "in 20 years you'll have a Cray killer in your pocket". Turns out he missed by a couple of years: The iPhone 4S, which came out in 2011, had just about the same floating-point performance as a Cray-1.
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  5. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    The introduction of digital cameras meant the start of new technology, and the engineers and marketing people at the time could probably not envision what the technology would eventually bring.
    As one of the engineers working on the first digital projects at Kodak we understood that photographers wanted immediacy - we saw the growth in minilabs with 1 hour service. That was a major driving force in our work.

    We also knew that photographers like convenient, easy to carry cameras they could take with them anywhere - we saw the popularity of the 110 and Disc cameras. The initial technology didn't make such cameras possible at that time.

  6. #56
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    My iPhone saves me from having to use film to take all the stupid pictures I post on my Instabookfaceblr. I love making Vine videos of concerts I see (which are good because they are limited to 8-9 seconds, meaning you can snap a quick video and get back to actually participating in the music, after you share it with your friend who is across the country and couldn't make the show...)
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  7. #57
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    As one of the engineers working on the first digital projects at Kodak we understood that photographers wanted immediacy - we saw the growth in minilabs with 1 hour service. That was a major driving force in our work.

    We also knew that photographers like convenient, easy to carry cameras they could take with them anywhere - we saw the popularity of the 110 and Disc cameras. The initial technology didn't make such cameras possible at that time.
    I didn't mean in terms of what the technology would be capable of. 'Smaller' is usually just a matter of time. I meant more what it would do to the camera market as a whole. First a virtual explosion, and now a bit of an implosion where we see news about camera phones eating into the traditional share of dedicated cameras, bit by bit, kind of like digital cameras did to film.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #58
    analoguey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Rose View Post
    The last line is so ironic
    How so?

    Sent from my LT26i using Tapatalk

  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I didn't mean in terms of what the technology would be capable of. 'Smaller' is usually just a matter of time. I meant more what it would do to the camera market as a whole. First a virtual explosion, and now a bit of an implosion where we see news about camera phones eating into the traditional share of dedicated cameras, bit by bit, kind of like digital cameras did to film.
    I don't think any of us have been surprised how things developed. Small cameras were in play from the start. See the 1996 Nikon Coolpix 100 info at http://www.nikonweb.com/coolpix100/ Nikon had a camera like that that even had an LCD back that could be written on with a stylus.

    It the old "the best camera is the one you have with you when a photo opportunity develops" thing. I used to always carry an Olympus Stylus XA with me; now I carry an Apple iPod touch. (The touch camera isn't as good as an iPhone, but it's plenty good for casual shooting.)

    If there is any surprise (at least for me), it is the speed that internet sharing took off.

  10. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    If there is any surprise (at least for me), it is the speed that internet sharing took off.
    Funny, but back in 1984-88, when I was helping Al Gore invent the internet, I saw none of this coming. Too busy writing code, I guess. Or too dumb.



 

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