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  1. #111

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    most movies you saw from the past 10-15 years have been scanned, edited and graded digitally and recorded back onto film for ditribution.

  2. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by visualbassist View Post
    most movies you saw from the past 10-15 years have been scanned, edited and graded digitally and recorded back onto film for ditribution.
    I bet it's been even longer than that ;-0

  3. #113
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Doc Martin

    I was listening to Rick Steves' radio show interviewing Martin Clunes. He's the producer and Mr. Clunes says it's shot on film. He says he liked the look of it. The show does looks lushous to me.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
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  4. #114

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    Doc Martin

    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    ...Martin Clunes. He's the producer...
    Actually, his wife Philippa Braithwaite is the producer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    ...and Mr. Clunes says it's shot on film. He says he liked the look of it...
    During its fundraising right now, our local PBS station is running a "making of" short about the program that was shot last year during Series 6 production. I was excited to no end when it revealed that film cameras are still being used. One can actually see a magazine being attached to one.

    Thanks for the tip; I'll try to find an on-line way to hear that Rick Steves interview.

    EDIT: OK, here's the link:


    Clunes' interview starts at 33:30. Steves does call him co-producer, although on-screen credits identify only Braithwaite. The shot-on-film comments can be found from 39:00 - 39:20.
    Last edited by Sal Santamaura; 02-03-2014 at 11:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    Probably not the end of non-motion picture film, but certainly the end of my patronizing any theaters. What's the point? There's a nice TV in my home.
    Well, time to eat crow. Yesterday, as has been our tradition, my wife wanted to "go see a movie" on Christmas day. So, even though the theater we've patronized (that until last year had kept one screen with film projection) has capitulated to distributors and gone fully digital, I agreed to see "The Imitation Game," which was originated on film. I'm not sure what projection equipment specifications were involved, but the image was still acceptable to me. Small differences included no image wander and a lack of flicker, but otherwise film's superior characteristics came through. Preview trailers for features shot digitally had an obvious "video" look. My new line in the sand is "only features originated on film.

  6. #116

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    The end of film? First studio stops distributing celluloid

    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    Well, time to eat crow. Yesterday, as has been our tradition, my wife wanted to "go see a movie" on Christmas day. So, even though the theater we've patronized (that until last year had kept one screen with film projection) has capitulated to distributors and gone fully digital, I agreed to see "The Imitation Game," which was originated on film. I'm not sure what projection equipment specifications were involved, but the image was still acceptable to me. Small differences included no image wander and a lack of flicker, but otherwise film's superior characteristics came through. Preview trailers for features shot digitally had an obvious "video" look. My new line in the sand is "only features originated on film.
    I still like to go to this one theater in my area which did not convert over to digital and continued using the old film projectors for movies since they still distributed movies on film.

    Well, now that some distributors are not sending out film movies, the theater hasn't done so well and they will be closing the doors early this upcoming year...

    I agree, movies that were originated on film still hold at least some of the film characteristics, and are certainly better then the digital originated movies in terms of subtle image quality.

    I do not purposefully go to movies that were only originated on film, however I can instantly tell when they were, and after the movie is over I go home and look it up to see if I was right, I have not been wrong once yet

    When digital can fool me, it will be an interesting day.

  7. #117
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    I'm really not sure I can tell the difference, and honestly I care even less than I can tell. I shoot film because I enjoy the process. But the process of watching the movie is the same either way. If I could tell a difference it might matter to me but I never notice one. Now some of the previews, and the definitely crappy resolution advertisements before hand, those I can tell.

    But I rarely go to theaters now anyway. I'll probably see the newest Hobbit movie because I'm a big Tolkien fan. But I have seen exactly one movie in a theater (Guardians of the Galaxy) since the last Hobbit movie last year. Instead I just wait for their release on Blu-Ray or Netflix and watching at home on my very digital projector with the 11' wide screen and 5.1 sound. More than close enough, the popcorn and snacks are much cheaper, no gas burned, no waiting in line, pause any time, bring my dog down to sit on the couch with us, whatever. Of course it's digital. Looks great to me though so I don't care.

    I'm a bit fanatical in my devotion to USING film, but even then not 100% - I shoot my share of iPhone snapshots and it's mainly trying to save money that's stopped me from buying a digital camera for all those family and vacation shots I just don't have time (or inclination, to be honest) to do properly in the darkroom.

  8. #118

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    It's usually a straightforward task to tell if something was made on film-- look at the highlights. Digital still can't manage the highlights, unless the lighting is well controlled. Skies continue to be blown out in digitally recorded films if there's a big enough difference between the highlights and darker areas. Movies done with film just don't have that problem. It's most obvious on low-budget documentaries, and sometimes high-budget ones as well (sports is another area where you see this a lot) Camera pans to the sky, and the highlights are completely gone.

    So long as digital can't manage highlights the way color negative film can, I'll keep right on using film. That and I strongly prefer a 4x5 crop and dislike 35mm, but that's another story.

  9. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    The question would be--what percentage of all film base is used for 35mm and 70mm print film? It seems like it must be significant.
    In the loooong past it was about 90%.
    Still and movie cam film may have contracted pro rata.

    But the key point is Ron's if Sony have 'rented' Kodaks coater for five years of ECN then we (would) have five years of fresh Tx and TMY-2? A possible alternative is less good

    Not been in movie theatre since the general release of Alien, only watch TV in shop windows.

    Note ilford made mono cine until 2002-2004 I still shoot HP5+ B&H sprockets.

  10. #120
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    I watch old movies on TV. Some are well done, others have issues simply because of the state of the technology back when they were made. I watch them because I like them or find them interesting.

    I'd do the same with movies captured on digital... except it seems most new movies are about showing off CGI, or merely being a poorly executed remake of an older movie (or subject matter that doesn't interest me, but that is outside this post).

    For example, I grew up on reruns of Speed Racer. When the movie came out, the trailers communicated it was all about the special effects - so I've not seen the movie. A friend went to see it, and confirmed my suspicions.
    The Haunting is another example. The remake was all about the special effects. The only "special effect" in the original was a couple guys pushing on a door with a piece of wood - plus I'd only seen it on late night TV and VHS... yet I liked it better, because it was about the story.

    I did see one Harry Potter movie at the theatre, and I did like it (plot-wise). However, it was captured on digital, so there were artifacts throughout the movie - and they really annoyed me. The artifacts were of the kind that film surpassed by the 1940s (if not earlier); I was watching a modern movie with problems that film resolved before my parents were born. Kind of sad.

    I wouldn't mind so much if the movies were otherwise good.
    Truzi



 

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