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  1. #31

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    Here's a list with big budget movies and shows shooting on Kodak motion picture film: http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Custo...ions/index.htm

  2. #32
    Ross Chambers's Avatar
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    Let's not forget that regardless of medium the cinema is a social experience shared with a sometimes large group of friends and strangers. I'll always remember the whole house reacting to a short and exciting sequence that I had constructed in a small cutting room with only the director for company.

    I write this in response to those electing to never go to a cinema but enjoy their films at home. I understand that some cinemas in US can be hazardous and a trip with family can be expensive and that the home cinema is a valid choice, but the slow demise of the social experience concerns me more than digital projection.

    BTW film sound has been digital for many, many years but there was no outcry about the loss of the poor quality optical mono track and suggestions of the superiority of the (sort of) synchronised disks that were used as one of the early sound systems.

  3. #33

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    "In a historic step for Hollywood, Paramount Pictures has become the first major studio to stop releasing movies on film in the United States"
    Might this mean that the movies in Question might be released in other countries in film?
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

    Regards
    Bill

  4. #34

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    no one besides luddites could give a crap what a movie is made with
    film or digital media, no one cares, to 9999 out of 10000 people "its just a movie" ..

    even film fanatics can't tell the difference between a film image and a digital one

    its just one more thing to whine about
    Last edited by jnanian; 01-18-2014 at 08:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #35
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Theatre owners that project digital cinema will be sacked with frequent upgrades to their systems. I think it cost over $100k. It doesn't benefit the theaters at all. Only benefits the movie studios by not having to make prints. Right now, the movie studio takes all the receipts from the movie AND 10% of concession sales. But google it.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  6. #36

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    I saw a 1934 nitrate print of "Counselor at Law" with John Barrymore shown on a projector in a cinema--can't remember if it was UCLA Archives or the Academy of Motion Pictures. The mono sound was terrific, better than the dupe prints shown on TV and probably better than whatever they used as a source for the DVD version. Nitrate is like looking at pure gold on the screen.

    Fewer and fewer people will have the experience of seeing the film in the manner it was meant to be shown, but that might change in the future. No one thought that people would pay millions for a Norman Rockwell painting and there's a lot more money behind the commercial art form that film represents. I wonder how many people on APUG have actually seen a dye transfer color film projected? There is nothing like it.


    Digital pictures--I like them almost as much as if they were real. The frame is as steady as a good Technicolor print and no dust or splices; plus the best low-light capture ability available. Not much detail and if the images are not captured on film the smears are just terrible. "Hobbitt I" in high frame rate looked worse than a TV set--you could see the actors' make-up! Just another medium; basically an additive color process. Movies I've seen all lean a little to the green with very few good reds. The cinemas have begun lowering the wattage on the projector lights so that now they show a darker black, (full gamma black), but all the other colors fade in the process. This might be because Spielberg complained that the digital projectors don't throw a true black. Or it might be because they are trying to save on electricity.

    Movies have always been a money driven enterprise. Either make film cheaper or charge more for a showing. Just have to make a profit and they will teach a pig to dance.

  7. #37
    Patrick Robert James's Avatar
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    I am sure one of the goals of the big studios is to own the entire chain so they can control it. Forcing theaters to go digital is one way since the capital expenditure is so high. We all know how long digital equipment lasts until there is another generation that has to be bought. Just a thought.

    I don't go to the theater much at all anymore. I can't stand the aliasing and all the other digital problems. I would rather see something projected with film. Combine that with the number of people who tweet their brains out right in your line of sight and the price of a ticket... It just isn't worth it. On the upside, in another decade perhaps, the digital image should be pretty spectacular when all of the annoying problems have been worked out.

    One of my favorite memories from my life was from back in the early 90's when I lived in Paris. I was dating a girl who loved movies, especially old ones. I must have visited nearly every little theater in the city. Some of them had only a couple dozen seats at most. It was almost like seeing a private viewing in your house. I assume most of them are gone by now. It was a wonderful experience though.

  8. #38

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    I went to some of those small Paris cinemas in the mid '90s. Great places and films were always shown in the original language, never dubbed.

  9. #39
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Isn't Ilford committed to making great b&w film? Kodak in whatever form it takes presently is making fantastic film too. Some other folks may or may not make film for us. Does it really matter? If you have a choice of b&w film for your hobby/profession, you choose Ilford or Kodak, right?

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Only benefits the movie studios by not having to make prints.
    At least in Norway digital benefits the audience. With digital every single digital theatre in the nation can show the movie the night it's released. All the cities and towns have made a coordinated effort to upgrade to digital. With film smaller theatres and rural locations have to wait for the big cities to finish the film, and they only get time for a couple of screenings before they have to pass the film reels on. Now all the theatres can run as many screenings as they like.

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