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  1. #131
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
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    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932

  2. #132
    jnanian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    My beard is older than most hipsters!
    but the question is do you count the age of your beard in dog years ..

  3. #133
    Two23's Avatar
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    I'm certainly not a hipster--there's no way I'd ever get a tattoo. I still associate them with carnies and ex-cons. However, I have been having fun the past two years using old box cameras. I often do hear, "Can you still get film for that?" I always reply, "No, but I keep using it anyway." Last night I was out with a large Gundlach Korona 5x7 camera taking some photos in a nearby park. I had several people come up and start talking to me about it. They were just interested is all. I've found that when I use one of my classic cameras such as a Leica, Rolleiflex, or Bessa folder it's easier for me to get people to pose for me than when it is when I use my modern Nikon. I find the spirit behind Lomography pretty interesting, actually.


    Kent in SD

  4. #134
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    but the question is do you count the age of your beard in dog years ..
    Nope- dude years.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #135
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Two23 View Post
    I've found that when I use one of my classic cameras such as a Leica, Rolleiflex, or Bessa folder it's easier for me to get people to pose for me than when it is when I use my modern Nikon.
    Yes, this really was my point too. I call them "novelty" cameras, where the novelty factor is often useful as the initial ice breaker. People who would otherwise be wary and aloof just aren't as threatened by antique or classic cameras. Or, significantly, the photographers who are carrying them.

    When acquiring my 4x5 Crown Graphic kit, I made sure that each piece was as close to brand new as possible. And cleaned up those pieces that weren't until they looked like they were. Not because I'm looking for attention. But because I want the camera to generate attention. Participatory portraiture. Not stealth portraiture.

    Often the first question asked is "Is that a replica?" "Nope. It's the real deal. A mid-1950s model press camera. Works beautifully." "But it looks brand new!" And at that point I've got 'em hooked.

    I do make a point of knowing a little of the history for each camera, and use that as part of my answers to questions. For instance, famous photos made with it that they might recall. Relating interesting stories and anecdotes serves to help put people on a more comfortable peer basis with you. You're simply telling them a fascinating story about a cool-looking old camera.

    I do often fib a little by stating that it's a new-to-me camera I'm just trying out. Harmless, and puts people even further at ease, since they're then obviously not the primary "target". Once they are comfortable, you'd be amazed at how many had grandfathers or great uncles that "used one of those" as newspapermen back in the day.



    Ken
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 07-15-2014 at 07:50 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Additional clarification...
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932

  6. #136
    Zedwardson's Avatar
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    Ken, I found the same thing. I can have my Canon (A typical Elan 7) and while people go "nice camera" its not noteworthy.

    I took out my new (to me) Yashica-Mat, and I had younger people fall over themselves to look at it.

  7. #137
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    A true "novelty camera" story...

    I was out once with the Crown in my local town just walking around. Had the whole-tomato kit going, flashbulbs and all. Three local homeless guys sized me up as I passed them by...

    "Hey! Whaddya' think yer' doin'?"

    "Uh... Trying out an old camera I just got."

    So the Big Guy ambles over for a closer look. Definitely not hipsters, these natural born killers appear to be equal parts angry and unbalanced. He approaches, sees the camera up close... and goes suddenly quiet.

    "I haven't seen one of those in years."

    A pause, then softly,

    "My dad used to have one just like that. He took pictures for the newspaper."

    Another pause while he thought about what he had just said, then,

    "Will you take my picture? All of us together?"

    "Absolutely."

    We moved to the side of a nearby brick building (this building actually, before the mural was restored). I asked for their patience, as I always do, while I made the incident light reading, framed, focused, used that focus distance to set the fill-flash aperture, set the shutter for ambient, and then said I was ready.

    You should have seen these guys primp themselves up for the picture. It was a really big deal to them. And so it was to me also. The photograph as an event worthy of momentarily pausing everything else.

    I never photograph people when they're down for the count. But for the grace of god... However when the novelty camera gets its foot in the door and I'm asked, I also never say no if I still have available film.

    So we did the "cheese" thing. They just loved the flashbulb going off. I gave the burned bulb to the Big Guy as a souvenir, as I always do. I knew I couldn't ask for an email address to send a scan, so instead,

    "If this turns out would you guys each like a copy?"

    The Big Guy thought for a moment, then spoke poignantly for them all,

    "No. What would we do with them anyway?"

    So I thanked them, shook hands, and we went our separate ways. As I walked away the Big Guy was looking hard at the burned flashbulb in his hand. I don't know what he was thinking...

    Ken

    Postscript: It was a good thing they said no to prints. The vintage shutter had misfired slow, causing the negative to be grossly overexposed. It was this incident that prompted me to send the shutter to Carol Flutot for her world famous glam-makeover treatment. It now works pretty much as-new, with reliable and repeatable speeds across the range.
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 07-16-2014 at 12:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932

  8. #138
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    But for the grace....

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    A true "novelty camera" story...

    I was out once with the Crown in my local town just walking around. Had the whole-tomato kit going, flashbulbs and all. Three local homeless guys sized me up as I passed them by...

    "Hey! Whaddya' think yer' doin'?"

    "Uh... Trying out an old camera I just got."

    So the Big Guy ambles over for a closer look. Definitely not hipsters, these natural born killers appear to be equal parts angry and unbalanced. He approaches, sees the camera up close... and goes suddenly quiet.

    "I haven't seen one of those in years."

    A pause, then softly,

    "My dad used to have one just like that. He took pictures for the newspaper."

    Another pause while he thought about what he had just said, then,

    "Will you take my picture? All of us together?"

    "Absolutely."

    We moved to the side of a nearby brick building (this building actually, before the mural was restored). I asked for their patience, as I always do, while I made the incident light reading, framed, focused, used that focus distance to set the fill-flash aperture, set the shutter for ambient, and then said I was ready.

    You should have seen these guys primp themselves up for the picture. It was a really big deal to them. And so it was to me also. The photograph as an event worthy of momentarily pausing everything else.

    I never photograph people when they're down for the count. But for the grace of god... However when the novelty camera gets its foot in the door and I'm asked, I also never say no if I still have available film.

    So we did the "cheese" thing. They just loved the flashbulb going off. I gave the burned bulb to the Big Guy as a souvenir, as I always do. I knew I couldn't ask for an email address to send a scan, so instead,

    "If this turns out would you guys each like a copy?"

    The Big Guy thought for a moment, then spoke poignantly for them all,

    "No. What would we do with them anyway?"

    So I thanked them, shook hands, and we went our separate ways. As I walked away the Big Guy was looking hard at the burned flashbulb in his hand. I don't know what he was thinking...

    Ken

    Postscript: It was a good thing they said no to prints. The vintage shutter had misfired slow, causing the negative to be grossly overexposed. It was this incident that prompted me to send the shutter to Carol Flutot for her world famous glam-makeover treatment. It now works pretty much as-new, with reliable and repeatable speeds across the range.
    Great, poignant story. Would make a wonderful short film.

  9. #139
    jnanian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    Nope- dude years.

  10. #140
    Zedwardson's Avatar
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    Indeed Snapguy, I do not get many comments on my Canon, but my Yashica-Mat always catches peoples eyes and starts a conversation. Even if it "is that a camera?" then "That is so cool/neat/ect." And with the older folks they get a smile when they see it and sometimes thank me for keeping one in working order.



 

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