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  1. #1

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    Slate.com article on "slow photography"


  2. #2
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    I can't help but be impressed, as he named three of the cameras currently found in my working collection!

    Back in the nineteen-ought-fifties my dad and I were fishing off a causeway that carried a drive into a state park. The park contained several thousand acres, miles of trails and a pair of creeks that produced more than twenty waterfalls on their way down the mountain. A car with two middle-aged women in it stopped. One got out and asked "Is this the lake?" (At the time, I thought that was pretty self-evident.) From her vantage point, she could probably see about one quarter of this body of water. I told her the name of the lake and said there were two others in the park. "But is this THE lake? The one people talk about?" So I said, yes, I'd guess so. She snapped two pictures in about three seconds, climbed back in the car. The driver did a K-turn and they drove away. I clearly remember the incident because even as fifteen year old, I thought that was bizarre behavior -- sort of like claiming to see a big city in an hour.

  3. #3
    CGW
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    Sympathies aside, the analogy is strained and one that's been beaten to death here and elsewhere. I see shooters fussing digital shots--whether with a DSLR or p&s--in about the same % as before with film. They're still a minority.

  4. #4
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    This resonates.

    I've written before that my personal favorite part of the photography experience is the part that happens before I pick up or set up a camera. This before part consists of walking around, seeking out, looking, thinking, and then hopefully seeing. Unencumbered by the hardware, and the expectations of use that go with it, it becomes solely an exercise in observation. Becoming more in tune with one's surroundings.

    At the appropriate time I may - or may not - then pick up a camera. But either way, the experience will usually have been a worthwhile one.

    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  5. #5
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I only take pictures of light, and exciting light does not wait for any one.

  6. #6
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    True, but if one is not looking in the right place for it, the net effect is the same...

    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  7. #7

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    I clicked on the link and saw the picture of the koi, and knew exactly where that was taken right away. I have a few photos just like it.

  8. #8
    Focus No. 9's Avatar
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    Great article and Links to the NY Times essay by Fred Conrad with LF photos and Tim Wu's slideshow link at the bottom of the Slate article. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you Frobozz.

  9. #9
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    I've written before that my personal favorite part of the photography experience is the part that happens before I pick up or set up a camera. This before part consists of walking around, seeking out, looking, thinking, and then hopefully seeing. Unencumbered by the hardware, and the expectations of use that go with it, it becomes solely an exercise in observation. Becoming more in tune with one's surroundings.
    Ditto for me, Ken. I took some guff in a thread here a year or so ago for using Minor White's term to describe it - previsualization. It's what happens before you directly see your subject... foreseeing. It is the conceptual exercise that seldom happens in the snap-happy auto-everything world of 'capture' and instant gratification.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  10. #10

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    From the article: "But if you really want to impose limits, a twin-lens reflex camera will force you to take your time."

    I was hoping that someone who'd bother to write an article like this would know more. Clearly the author knows nothing of large format photography. Sigh...

    If you really want to impose limits, try LF. Outside of press cameras it's nearly impossible to do LF fast. The essence of modern LF is slow and deliberate.
    Bruce Watson
    AchromaticArts.com

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