Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,962   Posts: 1,523,156   Online: 840
      
Page 5 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 85
  1. #41
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,816
    Images
    29
    Doctorfivechrome, I understand it to be an increase in their film volume over the previous year.

    Regarding dollar value, which dollar are you talking about? There are quite a few and some of them are doing quite well at the moment.

    Perhaps the North American market, which appears to be in free fall from where I sit at the moment, is reflected in your comments.

    I'm interested in your comment about there being over 300 labs closed in North America last year. Is there some source to reference this statement?

    Whilst many labs have been closing in my country (Australia), there are some opening up, including one not too far from me and another in my sister's country town. This appears to be going against all trends and market statements I know about my own country, but it is happening as I can see it with my own two eyes.

    Australia is a small world, I wouldn't under any stretch of the imagination, suggest that Germany is a little world.

    Effectively, Germany with it's economy, technology, manufacturing ability and capacity, is the powerhouse of Europe. Interestingly, Germany is currently being lead by a Doctor of Physics, which is a nice change from where most politicians seem to come from.

    Mick.

  2. #42
    Aristophanes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    505
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    Lomography stores and websites? It's absurd. It's the photographic equivalent of the "Easy-Bake Oven."
    Which was always the market norm from the Brownie on and carried the mini-lab industry on it's shoulders. "Easy-bake" cameras account for the vast majority of vernacular photos ever taken, probably by staggering margins over everything else combined. Economy of scale is a good thing and the dominant, critical issue facing film and camera and lab production.

    If film tries to contest the same fidelity (especially for colour) market space as digital, the table is tilted. At least lomography accepts and embraces film's foibles knowing it cannot compete against the clinical, sterile, non-tactile world of the digital sensor.

    As for saturation, maybe the dominant aesthetic emerging is that of Eggleston, in the same way that Rubens liked his women a certain way.

  3. #43
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,596
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    8% above what? What's the $ value of that 8% against total film sales last year? That's the big picture background that's necessary to grasp what's going on. Viewed in isolation of that, the chirping about Harmon/Ilford's 8% increase doesn't necessarily mean much.
    In the grand scheme of things in our commodified world, I agree.

    In a more localized/personal sense (for Ilford and us) though this is great news. An 8% growth in volume demonstrates viability for Ilford's business.

    I see this as a sign that the film/digital adjustment may be finding some balance, settling into the new norm.

    Listened to a show on the radio a while back, NPR book review I think, where they tried to find old technologies/tools that were no longer available. They couldn't find anything that was no longer available and in use somewhere.

    My point here is that each technology has it's hey-day then there's a new kid on the block that knocks the aging dude off the pedestal, doesn't mean the old dude goes away he just does things on a different scale.

    If you want to watch an example of this technological shift in real time watch the switch from laptops to iPads (and the like). I don't expect laptops to go away but I only open my personal laptop maybe once a month since I got my iPad.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #44
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,798
    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Fagan View Post
    Doctorfivechrome, I understand it to be an increase in their film volume over the previous year.

    Regarding dollar value, which dollar are you talking about? There are quite a few and some of them are doing quite well at the moment.

    Perhaps the North American market, which appears to be in free fall from where I sit at the moment, is reflected in your comments.

    I'm interested in your comment about there being over 300 labs closed in North America last year. Is there some source to reference this statement?

    Whilst many labs have been closing in my country (Australia), there are some opening up, including one not too far from me and another in my sister's country town. This appears to be going against all trends and market statements I know about my own country, but it is happening as I can see it with my own two eyes.

    Australia is a small world, I wouldn't under any stretch of the imagination, suggest that Germany is a little world.

    Effectively, Germany with it's economy, technology, manufacturing ability and capacity, is the powerhouse of Europe. Interestingly, Germany is currently being lead by a Doctor of Physics, which is a nice change from where most politicians seem to come from.

    Mick.
    Monetize the "increase' any way you wish, but it's not really meaningful in isolation of sufficient times series data to show a trend--and that trend isn't very rosy.

    The USA market is huge. More people live in California alone than in OZ, Canada too for that matter.

    DR5 is in the business. Why wouldn't he know? Labs have been folding steadily in my hood(Toronto)for the past 5 years--both low-end and pro labs alike. The reason? No consistent business. Upticks at surviving labs seem only to indicate the widespread elimination of comparable service. The increase in business doesn't reflect any real rise in the amount of film shot--quite the contrary.

    I wish it weren't so but simply denying it and/or citing isolated statistics without context won't change much.

    Analog photography may prove to be a "long tail" technology. Let's hope so. But there's no comeback likely.

  5. #45
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,596
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    But there's no comeback likely.
    +1
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    9
    Maybe not a mass comeback - but a revival is definitely happening.

    Last weekend - out in some crowds in Oxford I saw three other people carrying proper SLRs, one guy with a Mamiya RZ67 and someone else with a Diana. That's definitely an increase over recent years.

  7. #47
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    If the glass is half full or half empty depends on the mental attitude of the person looking at it.

    If a new wave of youngsters begins using film instead of photography, one can see it as a welcome reversal of a trend which we thought permanently established, or can see it as a fad. Only future will tell us.

    If newspapers begin noticing that film sales increase, one can see it as a reversal of a trend, or as a "dead cat bounce". Only future will tell us.

    If we notice that all producers of chemical stuff are still alive ten years after the "revolution", one can see it as a demonstration of the fact that film sales follow a different pattern than film camera sales, or can say that the entire industry smell strange.

    The only way we have to know if the film industry is still with us in ten years is to wait. In the meanwhile playing Cassandra does only show a certain uterine will to complain about a problem that is not there yet.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  8. #48
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,798
    In the meanwhile playing Cassandra does only show a certain uterine will to complain about a problem that is not there yet.

    Erh, the "problem" has been here for about the last decade. Where were you?

  9. #49
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    In the meanwhile playing Cassandra does only show a certain uterine will to complain about a problem that is not there yet.

    Erh, the "problem" has been here for about the last decade. Where were you?
    I was here and the "problem" (film producers going out of market) did never materialize. The "problem" it's just people like you who is screaming "Wolf" every day, because all this screaming might actually have the Wolf appear. Yes one day the Wolf might appear, which doesn't mean you were right ten years ago, or today. If anything else, it is your attitude which causes the film industry to collapse. If you like film, use it and I say it's no use whining about a future which is unknown to everybody, including me and you.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #50
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,798
    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    I was here and the "problem" (film producers going out of market) did never materialize. The "problem" it's just people like you who is screaming "Wolf" every day, because all this screaming might actually have the Wolf appear. Yes one day the Wolf might appear, which doesn't mean you were right ten years ago, or today. If anything else, it is your attitude which causes the film industry to collapse. If you like film, use it and I say it's no use whining about a future which is unknown to everybody, including me and you.
    "We" aren't the problem, it's everybody else--pro, amateur or otherwise--who stopped shooting film. FYI, the "wolf" took over the lease and sublets us the attic.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin