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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    I notice a lot. I see compression artifacts even in "Hi-Def" images. I see banding and "mosquito clouds." I see macroblocking and halos and I hear distortion in the sound.
    i think others (non-photographers/filmmakers/etc) just don't notice or care. too many times i find i'm the only voice in the room complaining about image compression, improper color balance, changes in filmstock, royalty free sound effects, etc.

    judging from their products the majority of media sources (tv, movies, print, etc) obviously don't care about lo-res or even poor quality reproductions of their images. if they did maybe the public would notice, or care.

    then again maybe its about passion.
    f3hp, passport polaroid, holga, 600, 67
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    retrospective in progress

  2. #12
    hoffy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fwank View Post
    i think others (non-photographers/filmmakers/etc) just don't notice or care. too many times i find i'm the only voice in the room complaining about image compression, improper color balance, changes in filmstock, royalty free sound effects, etc.

    judging from their products the majority of media sources (tv, movies, print, etc) obviously don't care about lo-res or even poor quality reproductions of their images. if they did maybe the public would notice, or care.

    then again maybe its about passion.
    You're right - People no longer care.

    I used to have a going joke with my boss at work. He was a mad Avatar fan, had seen it many times, thought it was the greatest movie ever made. As someone who really couldn't care less, I used to joke that I was going to wait until I could download it from the net and watch it on my iPod Nano......

    The respective Audio/Visual industries spent decades and decades researching, developing and perfecting replay methods, only for people to compress and then watch on mobile devices. Its no longer about authentic reproduction and a quality listening experience, its about how many shitty MP3's you can fit on your iPod.

  3. #13
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Digital distribution, as attractive as it seems, even at the most advanced projection venues is not all there yet. I've seen examples of DCP projection which involves the distributor sending the film to the theater on hard drive (way cheaper than shipping 35mm reels), and it comes with a code arranged between the distributor and venue that controls the location where the film may be screened and the dates. As easy as it seems this should be, there is often confusion around setting the codes, and there are new kinds of technical problems that are not repairable on the spot, like missing sound tracks or subtitle tracks, where the theater has to refund tickets to angry patrons. I'm hearing about more cases like this than problems with film, like reels being spooled upside down or backward or film breaking, but at least the projectionist can fix those kinds of problems. If you have a data error at one of the highly prestigious venues that can afford a DCP system, you're stuck.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
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  4. #14
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    I'm with David. You can stand by the projector and watch the film go through. You will instantly know whether your show is running right. If a problem develops you can see what's wrong and, with luck, correct it before the audience even knows. With digital projection, you have know way of knowing that there is a problem until after it has already occurred. You might be able to correct it. You might not.

    If you want to screw up a person's filmgoing experience for the rest of his life, teach him about cue dots. I've had Workstudy students who were operators in my booth come back, years later, and curse me for ever teaching them about how projection actually works. Once they learn to watch a film critically, from the technical standpoint, it becomes natural to see the splices going through the projector.

    If you really want to torture a person to death, you can teach them about CAP code dots.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coded_Anti-Piracy

    The truth is that most people don't even see these things, much less any other defects or digital artifacts. Though I don't expect everybody to be able to analyze a picture as well as I can, I do expect people to be able to recognize a quality image when they see it. That's what frustrates me the most.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    My father often found cinema-going a challenge. Most of the audience would be enjoying the movie, while he would be distracted by hard to detect emulsion scratches and slight variations in colour-balance as the film transitioned from reel-to-reel.

    And when the theatre showed a print that ought to have been retired a few (or more) screenings earlier - it would drive him nuts!

    All that from spending his days helping Kodak customers with, inter alia, their Single 8/Double 8/Super 8/16mm movies.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
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    Cinema distribution will move to server farms at redundant locations with projection via remote operators. This is already in testing.

  7. #17

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    http://www.facebook.com/panavision/p...89802671044405

    Panavision

    As a rental company, Panavision is committed to supporting our customers worldwide by providing them a wide range of camera equipment which includes film cameras. We continue to support our fleet of film cameras, and that includes ongoing major refurbishment, which in many cases means almost a complete rebuild of existing product. There is still significant demand for film equipment in many of our key markets, including studio feature film productions. So, while our ongoing focus is the transition to future products in the digital world, the implication that we’ve quit the film business isn’t accurate.

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