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  1. #21

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    I have the exact opposite experience with Superia Xtra 400. I am lucky to be in a town where the local camera store does an excellent job with film processing. They do an excellent job with all color print films but an outstanding job with Superia Xtra 400. I do not find it too contrasty. I find it to be just right. The quality of color negative film processing, developing and printing, has always been variable. It still is. I also think that in many cases, people who feel a film should be given extra exposure are not metering correctly to begin with. Having said that, the only 800 speed color rpoint films I used at 800 were Kodak and Fuji. The Konica, Agfa and store brand (Ferrania/3M?) 800 spoeed films looked better when shot at 640 or even 500. Digital printing has given us better control of contrast and that has helped with all films but bad processing can still make any film look bad.

  2. #22
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    This isn't a comment about scanning, but using a scanner to determine film exposure. A simple test I use is to scan a film frame and include the unprocessed area, but none of the sprocket holes. Make sure you adjust the black point so nothing is clipped in the scanner software (don't use auto exposure). Then open in photoshop and adjust the black point using levels. Hold down the option key (on the Mac, not sure on PC). You will see the clipped areas turn black. If significant area in the image turns black at the same time as the unexposed border, you are under exposing. If you need to go much past where the border clips then you have probably over exposed, or could have exposed less and still captured all the detail.

    In color you can adjust each color channel, or just use the RGB. You will see which channel clips first, which can tell you if the color balance was also correct.

    Try that out for a few frames on both films and see which works best.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by dynachrome View Post
    I have the exact opposite experience with Superia Xtra 400. I am lucky to be in a town where the local camera store does an excellent job with film processing. They do an excellent job with all color print films but an outstanding job with Superia Xtra 400. I do not find it too contrasty. I find it to be just right.
    This is good to know and I think I might give the 400 another stab not least as it's the only colour film still found in the high street round my town. I wonder now if my experience with 400 was due to poor scanning. I now print colour so I ought to give it another go. Most complaints about colour film that I've read online seem to be actually poor scanning complaints - so far by actually printing colour negs I've never found a bad film.
    Steve.

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