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  1. #11

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    Yep, slide film goes clear when fully fogged...

    Duncan

  2. #12

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    Here is a good example of fat-roll syndrome (negative film). I bobbled the roll while removing it from the back:



    You can see the light leaks as flares creeping in from the edges. You have an extreme case as the flares are meeting in the center.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img001a640x.jpg  

  3. #13
    clayne's Avatar
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    Ted, it's fogged. But atleast you got a single frame out of it and know the camera works. As someone else said: tuition.

    If you get into a lot of E6 I recommend just learning how to develop it yourself to cut down on costs.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  4. #14
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    Caveat: I have never loaded a Hasselblad.

    With that in mind, take this with a grain of salt.

    As I understand it, it is possible to load film incorrectly in a Hasselblad, and then have it sort of function.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Try loading 120 film into a Pentax 67. Guaranteed to teach you about dexterity, patience, courage and precision: I botched my first roll load, but that was about 8 or 9 rolls back. Oh, and watch out for the shutter curtain...

    The suggestion that you leave the roll tape on (usually bearing the film description) until the reel is firmly bedded down, then remove the tape and thread it across is an excellent idea that I have recently taken up on for extra security. Also, use two fingers ('V' shape) to hold down the top and bottom of the roll firmly as you thread the leader across: this will also keep the reel tightly wound. Only When the film is threaded and wound a little, place your hand over the film spool to protect against light leak, then close the back (but remove hand first! ). Never failed me.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    Oh, hang on...I've just realised - this is Fuji Provia 400X transparancy film, not negative film. So a solid white exposure on this is the equivalent of a solid black on a negative? Yes?

    So the solid white shots are totally fogged and the few that came out with some degree of image are the one's that were perhaps sufficiently unfogged to produce some kind of partial image, allbeit unusable? Am I right?
    You're totally correct. Light has really got into the roll quite badly. (And, in the top strip, you can, I think, see where the light has reflected on the numbers on the adjacent film backing paper). The sharp boundary on the lower strip between the clear base and the usable image seems to be where the centre of the roll was tightly rolled (was this one of the first images on the film, hence nearest the centre of the spool?).

    Matthew Rubarsky's picture is a very typical example of how edge fogging from a loose roll would appear on the print (black, of course, on the neg). I've a stack of old negs given to me by an elderly relative (taken by her Father on a Box Brownie), which show this to a small extent on almost every one...guess the film-loading and wind-on on the Brownies was not very sophisticated!

  7. #17
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    Ice racer 2 feet really!!!.. the whole paper doesn't go 4 feet!!
    I measured it's about 10 inches!!

    OP... you are likely ok.. it happens now and then, and at worst in your situation you got some edge fog as long as you cinched it up fast. It happened to me outdoors in summer sun, I'd shift it into my body's shadow FAST, and tighten it up..

  8. #18
    edp
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    That is some funny-looking fogging, with the first frame fine right up to the edges of the film, then a sharp cutoff from one good frame to the rest of the roll almost completely exposed.

    Loose-roll fogging looks more like irregular blotching starting at the sides, and generally decreasing in severity towards the centre of the roll. I'd say that in addition to some damage from having a loose roll, all but one of the pictures were considerably overexposed to begin with, and you do say it's a new camera and you were shooting "just to get used to using my blad and light meter".

  9. #19
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    edp - I was thinking that myself. The film becoming a bit loose is one thing, but to see entire frames look like they've been unwound and held up to the window is another.

    I'm worried it's something more serious with the camera or with me and how I've operated it so maybe it was getting exposed to light when just sat idle. I'm not sure? Maybe I need to just have another go and see what happens.

    WHat's the situation with the film back metal slide? I realise you can't take a shot while it's inserted, so I always had that out while taking shots. When loading film, does that need to be kept in place or removed?
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  10. #20
    chioque's Avatar
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    To give you some piece of mind, why don't you sacrifice one roll of B&W film and develop yourself, to see whether it's the camera having problems as well.

    As for the dark slide, I only remove it when taking shots. Other than that it's slotted in.

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