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  1. #1
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    School boy error - my 1st roll of 120 got loose wile loading. Ruined?

    Hi

    Just had a play at loading my Hasselblad 501CM with my first roll of Fuji Provia 400X. I followed a guide or two on YouTube first, but suffice to say that I made a mistake and the roll became very slightly loose (I guess I'm too used to the light tight way 35mmis loaded into its canister). Not entirely but there was perhaps a 1mm gap along the whole roll. The question is - is the whole roll ruined and should be binned or is there a fair chance the shots won't be fogged? I ask because if there is no chance it's OK, I'd rather not pay for it to be developed. I've taken some shots with it anyway just to get used to using my blad and light meter.

    I was indoors in a window lit room. It wasn't in bright sunshine but there was certainly light in the room.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  2. #2
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    Hi

    Just had a play at loading my Hasselblad 501CM with my first roll of Fuji Provia 400X. I followed a guide or two on YouTube first, but suffice to say that I made a mistake and the roll became very slightly loose. Not entirely but there was perhaps a 1mm gap along the whole roll. The question is - is the whole roll ruined and should be binned or is there a fair chance the shots won't be fogged? I ask because if there is no chance it's OK, I'd rather not pay for it to be developed. I've taken some shots with it anyway just to get used to using my blad and light meter.

    I was indoors in a window lit room. It wasn't in bright sunshine but there was certainly light in the room.
    Been there, done worse. I'd develop it. If it's OK, you're smiling; if not, consider it "tuition."

  3. #3
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    There is about 2 feet of plain paper before the film. You should have it developed so you know in the future if what you did ruined the whole thing. I suspect the inner (last) frames may be OK. Even if it is fogged a little, you still should be able to see if you had focus, stability and exposure correct on the rest of the roll. Basically its a test roll anyway because its your first roll.

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    Did you mean that the 1mm gap was along one edge, i.e. the backing paper not centrally wound on the spool? Or was it just not tightly wound?

    Either way, I'd go with the other replies and have it developed...may well be OK, backing paper is very light-resistant, and light doesn't track along through the base of an ordinary film to any great extent.

  5. #5
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    Did you mean that the 1mm gap was along one edge,
    Hard to explain, but if you laid the roll flat down onto a table and looked at the plastic inner spool, the film was wrapped around it (of course) but the gap between one lap round and the next lap round the spool and got to about 1mm, maybe less. When I eventually got it in the holder it tightened up OK, but it might have been too late you see.

    I will get it developed as you have all stated so far. You never know, and as you say, it will give me an idea for future rolls if this happens again as to whether I have ruined it or not, and therefore whether to shoot with it at all. Imagine the scenario - at a wedding getting the 12 money shots, and the film got fogged! |Thats why I am experimenting well in advance of ever using it for anything serious!

    Ted
    PS - for the benefit of others who might read this who are in my shoes - a nice HOW TO here : http://silverbased.org/load-120-film/)

    Ted
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  6. #6
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    120 can fog the edges fairly easy so you need to take care in handling.

    Also you might want to make sure the dark slide seal is good in your back if you got it used.
    These need to be replaced every few years depending on use but at least it is easily distinguishable if leaking and easy/cheap to fix yourself.

  7. #7
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Only one way to know for sure, develope it. For future reference, never set a roll down that has been untaped.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
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    One useful hint - don't take the "wrapper" paper band off the roll of film until after you have it clicked into the back or insert. That way, if you fumble it a bit, the roll will remain tightly wrapped until it is where it belongs.

    Just be sure to retrieve the entire paper band from the camera.

    Some cameras give you more access to the band than others, but I've yet to encounter a camera that this doesn't work with.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    Hey Peeps!!

    Help! I'm not sure what the hell I've done and I'm hoping you guys can help me.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but a film accidentally exposed to light would fog it, and in a severe case, make the whole film a fairly solid black? Well, check out the attached, which is a flatbed scan of my "exposures". As you can see, one has been "correctly exposed", 2 or 3 have very slight images that are barely visible of my 3 year old daughter and the rest look like they've not been exposed to light at all...either in the camera or out of it?

    Has my slight unrolling of the film caused this or have I not used my Blad properly? I made sure the film was wound on for each shot and that the small screen had a white colour in it to avoid any double exposing.

    Ideas please? I need to leanr what I am doing wrong!!

    Ted
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Scan-120125-0001.jpg  
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  10. #10
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    Oh, hang on...I've just realised - this is Fuji Provia 400X transparancy film, not negative film. So a solid white exposure on this is the equivalent of a solid black on a negative? Yes?

    So the solid white shots are totally fogged and the few that came out with some degree of image are the one's that were perhaps sufficiently unfogged to produce some kind of partial image, allbeit unusable? Am I right?
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

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