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  1. #11

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    Cheer up! Nowadays there are a lot less color films you need to compare! But I must say that Kodak
    over the years did a remarkable job getting neg films to work with a range of complexions, even if
    non-skintones fell off the end of the world at times. What it important to the specific "look" or signature of a film or paper is what it does wrong just as much as what it does right. What is idiosycratic for one application might be pure magic for another. And to figure that out, you need
    to spend a lot of time in the trenches, long enough at least for the film to be withdrawn from the
    market just when you think you've finally mastered it!

  2. #12
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    This is essentially what we did Ted. Except the lighting was optimum for the scene (as much as possible) and the variations were the films and exposures as noted above.

    It is quite revealing.

    BTW, some samples were sent out for image stability tests as well.

    PE

  3. #13
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    Drew;

    Think of Portra for skin tones and Ektar for scenic or landscape. Then think of Gold for extremes. Just a thought.

    PE

  4. #14

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    That's the bind I'm in right now - stuffing the freezer with Ektar, esp 8X10, since they've already stopped cutting it in sheet film sizes. It's a niche that's not likely to reappear in color neg film, since
    more skintone-friendly Portras and Fujis are going to be more popular and more likely to have
    continued availability from someone. Too bad more folks didn't learn how to use Ektar correctly.
    Sometimes the web disseminates bad info or a bad rap very quickly. Now I've got only a limited amt
    of time to figure out which film whill make the best internegs from masked trannies, but my guess
    is that it will be Portra 160, since the previous 160VC was prone to exaggerate things a bit. Again,
    a valid nonadvertised application which we just have to figure out on our own.

  5. #15
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    Portra, pulled 1/2 stop makes an excellent internegative film.

    PE

  6. #16

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    Thanks Ron. I'll have to keep that tip in mind. Most of the time I'd be masking the chrome anyway to
    have my cake and eat it too, in terms of both contrast range and hue saturation. Last time I took
    a couple of specially contrast-modified 8x10 dupes intended for Ciba printing and contacted the
    internegs from these, and it worked superbly. With 8x10 you can go a fourth-generation printing neg
    and still hold remarkable detail even in a large print. But that's particular workflow is unnecessarily
    complicated for routine internegs. Just hope the supply of Porta sheet film is healty long enough for
    me to stockpile some. I've already spent way more film money than I wanted to, just with the other
    Kodak discontinuations, not to mention catch-as-catch-can dye transfer supplies.

  7. #17
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    Drew;

    I think that 1/2 stop is too much as an absolute, now that I think about it. In terms of time it is about 15" - 30" less in the developer than the normal time. You have to adjusts for your exposure time and light source as well.

    I got this direct from EK engineers when they discontinued the interneg film.

    The light source must be daylight balanced. I use 100C + 30M to get that.

    PE

  8. #18

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    Yes, I standardize on daylight balance for this kind of thing. But I can do it very precisely due to my
    additive colorhead and other specialized gear. I'm still in the stages of fine-tuning; but so far it seems Portra is even better for this than the old Interneg film itself. Too many projects going on at once right now.

  9. #19

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  10. #20
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    Well, the old interneg film had an upswept shoulder that was there to "fix" the toe of the slide film during the duplication process. As a result, you lose highlight detail when duping onto Portra when compared to the old interneg film. A masking step will help fix this.

    PE

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