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  1. #1

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    1993 Ektachrome 160T worth shooting?

    Back in November of 2010, I got five rolls of frozen 1993 K25 from craigslist. Along with the deal, I also got three rolls of Ektachrome 160T tungsten film. The K25 turned out Really good. So I assume that all the film was properly stored over the years. I've been wondering recently if I should even bother with the 160T, or just throw it away. Does anyone here know whether it is generally a stable film? Or does it tend to experience color shifts even with proper storage?

  2. #2
    zsas's Avatar
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    I shot some that was about that same vintage and it came out, but I cross processed it in c41, so the shifts, if any had been amplified since I didnt have it processed in E6. Give it a try, the changes, if any, can be fun
    Andy

  3. #3

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    Whatever you do don't just throw it away. Whenever I hear that it gives me reflux.

  4. #4
    zsas's Avatar
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    So true tbea - OP don't toss it! Tungsten film when shot outside and then crossed has a beauty all it's own, below is a 64t that was crossed and rehaled..

    Last edited by zsas; 01-22-2012 at 08:42 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Thype-oh
    Andy

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbeaman View Post
    Whatever you do don't just throw it away. Whenever I hear that it gives me reflux.
    yeah if you don't want it I'll take it.

  6. #6
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Ha. I just stumbled across a roll of 400 Ektachrome expired in '89 in the back of my freezer and was wondering how likely it is to be good...
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  7. #7

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    I am currently going through a stack of old Ektachrome 100HC film from 1988/1990. It's not too bad after ~24 years, slight pink tinge, even after colour correction (yes, hybrid; I recently printed some of the pictures, the only practical way to print slides is to digitise them, sad, I know).

    Here's one:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    And another, which actually looks better after colour correction:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The leaves of the tree fell off 3 days after I shot this. (18/12/11)

    Not too bad overall. I am not a big fan of cross processing. Not my cup of tea, I suppose.

    -R
    Last edited by ricardo12458; 01-24-2012 at 10:04 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: really good picture

  8. #8
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    It's not the only practical way, digitizing. There's still some Ilfochrome (the last batch) and it's possible and practical (but a lot more trouble) to make internegatives. But scanning is certainly the easiest way these days.

  9. #9

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    I've used films up to 20 years old with negligible loss of quality. Recently shot an Orwo color neg film, the last batch of C-41 dated 1992 before the factory closed, and the prints are indistinguisable from in-date Kodak taken at the same time.
    The film was refridgerated most of the time, but had then been in bottom of one of my camera bags for at least a couple of years.

    (But, obviously, don't use anything other than fresh film for your daughter's wedding....the possible consequences don't bear thinking about! )

  10. #10
    phirehouse's Avatar
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    Old film is fun...shoot it up.

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