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  1. #201
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I think I would find loading any of my 35mm cameras in complete darkness impossible. Sometimes it's hard enough in room light.

    Be that as it may, it sounds like the bulk rolls, if loaded carefully into good quality cartridges, might be immune to the problem. And that's interesting. If I get back into doing my own E6 and this stuff is still around I'll likely try that. 200 is also a very convenient speed for a slide film IMO, as the existing films, other than remaining stock of Provia 400X, top out at 100 and I often just find that too darned slow as I wind up in deep shade or the like.

  2. #202
    AgX
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    Refering to post # 200

    -) at the factory films are typically loaded into the plastic canisters/cans in light

    Which means that opening those cans in darkness would typically not be beneficial.


    -) light piping (if that should be the cause) has nothing to do with the velour sealing of the cassettes

    Which means that with a film that suffers from light piping the best velour seal would be of no effect.
    Last edited by AgX; 09-13-2013 at 02:47 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #203
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    well, i did a kinda experiment. I had roll i rolled from my 100 foot bulk roll that was unshotd for about 3 months. just forgot about it. it was stored in a fuji white film canister and sat on my film shelf for that time. the first 6 or so shots clearly had light piping, the next 4 had slight signs and the rest of the roll was fine. While I can't speak for pre-rolled film I think what has already been mentioned, the film base, is the cause of the problem. it clearly "pipes" light to the film and does its magic that way. I rolled another roll to act as a control group. I rolled it in a changing bag and loaded the camera in the bag as well to make sure all is dark. then developed the film that day. No issues on any frame.

    So clearly if you have a bulk roll, if you pre-roll some store them in total darkness

  4. #204

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    My Rube Goldberg mind just thought of taping a leader of traditional based film to the Aviphot to prevent 'light piping' during storage and loading.

    No... don't laugh at me
    - Bill Lynch

  5. #205
    AgX
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    I don't laugh!

    That would work only to that extent that the film would not have got excessive exposure via that short leader during manufacture.
    But a good and simple DIY approach nevertheless.



    (A good use for all that Kodachrome around...)

  6. #206

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    Somehow "light piping" does not seem to be real hard to control, just following directions written by Rollei about handling Polyester Base Film produces very consistant and predictable results, remember, there are several other Agfa Aviphot films in color and B&W that are Polyester packed up by Maco/Rollei, I don't seem to recall anyone having trouble with the other films about "light piping"

    Let us remember...... Some of us found Agfa Aviphot Chrome 200 cut and packed by Maco/Rollei that has a very distinctive Yellow cast to it!
    And No! this screwed up film showed no signs of being fogged by "light piping"

    This "Yellow" CR-200 problem is because of poor storage, exposure to heat or fumes, bad manufacturing or packing, doubtful light leaks are to blame.

    The folks who cut and package the Agfa Aviphot Chrome 200 are by now well aware of this "Yellow" slide film problem by now, at least the folks at Lomography, FreestylePhoto and a few other vendors of this film have assured us that they will properly test their newest lots of this color slide film to be sure it looks correct.

    I am sure Maco/Rollei know about this problem but as far as I know they have not commented one bit to inquiries about "yellow' slide film.

    I along with a lot of you are still wondering what happened that ruined certain (Many) rolls of that CR-200 such that it resulted in that nasty Yellow color cast

  7. #207

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    Alpenhause gives reasons to think that the yellow of Aviphot slit and packed by Maco in recent years was not caused by light piping.

    I can only repeat what I wrote before. Two 35mm rolls of Aviphot from different batches spooled by Maco showed no yellow when I put them into (different) cameras inside a changing bag. Every other roll from these batches, which I put in the cameras in subdued light, showed a lot of yellow.

    How can this be explained?
    1/ I am not telling the truth. Either I made a mistake, or I am lying. I did not make a mistake, and why would I want to lie about this?
    2/ This is a huge coincidence. After shooting 10 rolls from 4 different batches, with every roll being yellow, I randomly picked two further rolls from two of the same batches, and by pure coincidence neither was yellow.
    3/ For some reason, Aviphot slit and spooled by Maco in recent years, when loaded into a camera in complete darkness, does not come out yellow. Otherwise it does come out yellow.

    I think only 3/ is reasonable. If this is not caused by light piping, due to poor cassettes which allow some light into the cassette and which light then pipes down the film, there must be another reason related to the cassettes used by Maco. The cassettes used by Wittner do not allow yellowing when the film is loaded in subdued light.

    I would be very happy to hear any other suggestions. Anyway, I am now happy to use film spooled by Maco when I have the chance to load the film into my cameras in complete darkness. Otherwise I shall use film spooled by Wittner.

  8. #208
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    Seems reasonable to me. Technically speaking, though, you should probably load one more roll in your camera without using the changing bag.
    Unfortunately, narrowing down the problem further can truly be a waste of the film. Otherwise, perhaps open the plastic film canister in a bag, find a way to protect the leader and velvet area, and expose the canister to light. Then back into the bag to load the camera. Repeat protecting leader and one end of the can, then leader and the other end.
    Truzi

  9. #209
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlodekmj View Post
    Alpenhause gives reasons to think that the yellow of Aviphot slit and packed by Maco in recent years was not caused by light piping.

    I can only repeat what I wrote before. Two 35mm rolls of Aviphot from different batches spooled by Maco showed no yellow when I put them into (different) cameras inside a changing bag. Every other roll from these batches, which I put in the cameras in subdued light, showed a lot of yellow.

    How can this be explained?
    1/ I am not telling the truth. Either I made a mistake, or I am lying. I did not make a mistake, and why would I want to lie about this?
    2/ This is a huge coincidence. After shooting 10 rolls from 4 different batches, with every roll being yellow, I randomly picked two further rolls from two of the same batches, and by pure coincidence neither was yellow.
    3/ For some reason, Aviphot slit and spooled by Maco in recent years, when loaded into a camera in complete darkness, does not come out yellow. Otherwise it does come out yellow.

    I think only 3/ is reasonable. If this is not caused by light piping, due to poor cassettes which allow some light into the cassette and which light then pipes down the film, there must be another reason related to the cassettes used by Maco. The cassettes used by Wittner do not allow yellowing when the film is loaded in subdued light.

    I would be very happy to hear any other suggestions. Anyway, I am now happy to use film spooled by Maco when I have the chance to load the film into my cameras in complete darkness. Otherwise I shall use film spooled by Wittner.
    I know of samples from Maco conversions that did not come out yellow and definitely had not been loaded into the camera in complete darkness.
    I do not see a relationship between the quality of the velour seal and light piping.
    Nevertherless your experiences are puzzling.

  10. #210

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    Anyone have experience of it in 120 lately?



 

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