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  1. #1
    /dev/null's Avatar
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    Kodak EKTACHROME - E100VS at boxspeed?

    Hi All,

    I love the Velvia50 for it's saturated colors. I picked up two boxes of the Kodak E100VS (120mm) and wanted to check.

    Is it best to just shoot at boxspeed or anything I need to know when shooting with this film? Someone gave me the advice to shoot it at 200 and then push process, but don't really know what good that will do. I have some E6, so can develop myself.

    Thanks! Yuri.

  2. #2
    Lionel1972's Avatar
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    I always underexpose my slides by 1/3 of stop for I like my colors slightly more saturated then what I get from boxspeed. I also enjoy projecting my slides, so a bit underexposed is good for that too.

  3. #3
    /dev/null's Avatar
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    I will probably just scan, not project it or so.

  4. #4
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Use it as it said , it has even lots of saturation for box speed. It will have a speed advantage at use at dark Holland winter days also.

  5. #5

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    I don't shoot much of it because I generally prefer Velvia 50, but when I do I rate it at 125 (I rate Velvia 50 at 50, FWIW). Obviously it much of it depends on your meter calibration and how you meter. Bracket to get a feel for it.

  6. #6
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Kodak know a lot more than us about the films speed, if the box says ISO 100 I would shoot the first roll at that before considering changing your rating.
    Ben

  7. #7
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    +1 to benjiboy and Mustafa. In perfect tradition the question arose how to rate a specific film and the range of responses covered a whole range of over- and underexposures.

    To all those who rate at ISO 101.5, 89.765 and 105.9: Do you use calibrated light meters, fine tuned E6 processing with fresh chems and can you tell to which exact density you develop the region you base your light measurement off? You use fresh film and certainly develop your film right after exposing it, don't you?

    To all those who don't do the above things: see what Mustafa and benjiboy suggested, and change ISO rating only if you can achieve moderate consistency and still encounter problems.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  8. #8

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    I've always been very satisfied with the performance at box speed.

  9. #9
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    +1 to benjiboy and Mustafa. In perfect tradition the question arose how to rate a specific film and the range of responses covered a whole range of over- and underexposures.

    To all those who rate at ISO 101.5, 89.765 and 105.9: Do you use calibrated light meters, fine tuned E6 processing with fresh chems and can you tell to which exact density you develop the region you base your light measurement off? You use fresh film and certainly develop your film right after exposing it, don't you?

    To all those who don't do the above things: see what Mustafa and benjiboy suggested, and change ISO rating only if you can achieve moderate consistency and still encounter problems.
    I actually personally rate my transparency films to suite the power of the IQ lamp in my my slide projector to get the right density on projection, and I use incidental light metering to expose the film to give all the slides the same density, so on projection you aren't going from a bright image to a dark one when showing them.
    Ben

  10. #10

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    I'd shoot at box speed, or in very bright conditions, maybe a little lower. Sometimes I've accidentally underexposed E100, and it looks pretty nice. Depends on what you're looking to achieve though really.

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