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  1. #11
    dehk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thegman View Post
    Vision 500T is a movie film, so won't it have a remjet backing? Which causes problems for C41 development?
    Gonna send them off and develop them in ECN3
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

  2. #12
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    The last time I spooled out 600ft to 200ft rolls to fit a bulk loader I did it on a table. Just start winding up a little coil of film, you don't need a plastic core. Keep it from unwinding. The bigger your coil, the faster it goes. Only had to do it 3 times so it was not too bad. When done, tape the end of it or just put it in the bulk loader.

  3. #13
    dehk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    If the film is wound tightly on its spool/reel you won't have to worry about getting cinch mark scratches in the emulsion. It is only when the film is wound loosely, allowing the layers of film to slip against each other that you get cinch marks.

    Make a pair of rewinding spindles and use them to wind the film from the stock reel onto four smaller spools for use in the bulk loader or get a hand operated bench winder for movie film from eBay.

    I'd use empty spools like the kind Fuji ships film on. That way, as long as you keep the right tension on the film, you won't get any proud edges or scratches.

    Put those spools into empty film cans like they originally came in, tape the lids on, label them for future reference and store until you are ready to use.
    Sounded like the winner here.
    - Derek
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  4. #14
    dehk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    The last time I spooled out 600ft to 200ft rolls to fit a bulk loader I did it on a table. Just start winding up a little coil of film, you don't need a plastic core. Keep it from unwinding. The bigger your coil, the faster it goes. Only had to do it 3 times so it was not too bad. When done, tape the end of it or just put it in the bulk loader.
    Thanks, that make sense too
    - Derek
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  5. #15

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    I've never understood the obsession with bulk film loaders. I'm making my way through a 400' roll of outdated 35mm FP4 and all I ever do is open it in the dark, reel off a length about equal to the span of my outstretched hands and load it into a cassette. More scientific measurements can be applied if required but that gives me somewhere between 30 and 36 exposures, depending on how stretchy I am that day. I tend to err on the short side and aim for the low 30s so that I don't end up with the usual problem of not being able to get the last couple of frames loaded into the developing reel. I normally load a few cassettes in a session.
    Steve

  6. #16
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    I don't have a problem with winding film. I have personally handled enough 35mm cine film to wrap around the world several times.
    But for differences in film base composition and the shape of the sprocket holes, 35mm cine film is virtually identical to 35mm photo film. More than 90% of the time cine film will work in place of photo film without any problem.

    Consequently, handling film is second nature to me. Winding on reels or spools, measuring or cutting, handling by the edges and keeping the emulsion side of the film in the right orientation are just natural things. The difference lies in the fact that raw stock film must be handled in the dark lest it be spoiled.

    I often do spool-off and manipulate lengths of film in the dark to be rolled into cartridges for use or for other purposes. Handling film in the dark is integral to the developing process. How else do you get film onto the reels for developing? The thing is, working in the dark just isn't convenient. That's the reason why I use a bulk loader.

    It's a lot easier, faster and more convenient to handle film in the dark just one time before it is loaded into cartridges. I don't have to turn off the lights before unpacking the film, wind the film in the dark then repack the film (and double check my packing) before turning the lights back on. It's quicker, easier and less troublesome to use a loader. If I decide I need a roll of film at the last minute before I leave the house, it's a small matter to use the loader to wind one off.

    So, I don't have a problem just measuring off a length of film in the dark when I need to or want to. I just think it's more convenient to use a loader.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    So, I don't have a problem just measuring off a length of film in the dark when I need to or want to. I just think it's more convenient to use a loader.
    Same here. Which is also why I cut down my long rolls into 100 ft chunks from the very start. That way when I need to fill a bulk loader I can do it in my lap in a changing bag rather than needing a dark room.

    I have a nice pair of rewinds mounted on a board with rubber feet; a good set of split reels in various sizes (up to 2000 feet); a big supply of 2" plastic cores; and a big supply of metal cans with bags - both the 100ft ones from bulk still film, plus a pile of 200/400/1000/2000 ft ones from cine film. While all the other methods will work (especially the one where you lay the big roll of film flat on a surface with an axle to spin on), this set of supplies makes winding off film into bulk loader lengths quick and easy. And a bulk loader, as you say, makes generating a 35mm cartridge full of film a quick and easy thing to do under any lighting conditions.

    Duncan

  8. #18
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    Maybe you'll get some tips in this old thread?
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/9...canisters.html
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  9. #19
    dehk's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for the help once again!
    - Derek
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Roberts View Post
    I've never understood the obsession with bulk film loaders. I'm making my way through a 400' roll of outdated 35mm FP4 and all I ever do is open it in the dark, reel off a length about equal to the span of my outstretched hands and load it into a cassette. More scientific measurements can be applied if required but that gives me somewhere between 30 and 36 exposures, depending on how stretchy I am that day. I tend to err on the short side and aim for the low 30s so that I don't end up with the usual problem of not being able to get the last couple of frames loaded into the developing reel. I normally load a few cassettes in a session.
    Steve
    It occurs to me that Steve's method would work well with my Canon EOS cameras that pre-wind the film to the end before one takes the first shot - especially if you are like me and prefer something like 24 exposure rolls.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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