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  1. #11

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    Thanks Drew!
    I wonder if I could use the meter readings from my 5DMkII?
    I currently have it set to spot, which I have learned to use very successfully, of course using manual mode, and changing as I deem necessary.
    Though, I think this would be a good discussion for a new topic?
    I'm sure to ask this again...

  2. #12

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    Roger,
    Wow!
    Thanks for the good read!
    Heh, I will have to read this slowly to "digest" the great information you present.
    Then I will be able to answer/ask questions you/I may have.

  3. #13
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buggz View Post
    Roger,
    Wow!
    Thanks for the good read!
    Heh, I will have to read this slowly to "digest" the great information you present.
    Then I will be able to answer/ask questions you/I may have.
    You're welcome. I edited a bit on the comments about scanning color neg versus transparency based on Drew's comments. I've heard from some folks that E6 still scans better/easier, but I've also read others saying that isn't true. I've not scanned my own so can't really say. I've gotten good scans back from color negs, and modern C41 is designed for better scanning than older films, but E6 may still have the edge. But as folks have said, exposure is a LOT more critical so with limited film experience I'd still recommend color neg to keep from going broke and getting frustrated trying to learn what you're doing. It's not exactly difficult but will take some work and experience and film used.

    Spot on about the meter. You may be able to use a digital camera but I'd still get a handheld meter and learn how to use it. Starting out an averaging meter (that is, not a spot meter) may be better. I have a Luna Pro SBC which is a great meter and there's a 7.5 "spot" (not as narrow as a real spot) attachment. I use that for my medium format and backup for my 4x5 where I normally use a spot meter. I picked up the pair of meter and spot attachment for less than $100.

  4. #14
    fotch's Avatar
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    Ditto on getting a seperate meter. You will use it no matter what camera or type you use. Even didital work benifits from using one.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by zach View Post
    Fuji 160S in 4x5 is only available in Europe right?
    Unless these guys are out of stock, no.
    http://www.vanbar.com.au/catalogue/product.php?id=75133

  6. #16
    keithwms's Avatar
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    You can get a lot of Fuji films from Japan Exposures, including quickloads of astia 100f and 160s.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  7. #17

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    I'd stick to color neg too..

    Fuji 160S > pastel, awesome for skintones where you want them to be more pink

    Portra 400 > warm, awesome for skintones where you want them to be more orange

    Ektar 100 > kind of warm, awesome for pictures of things, or people in flat lighting. High saturation, contrasty, just about invisible grain unless you're shooting 135.

  8. #18
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    You can get a lot of Fuji films from Japan Exposures, including quickloads of astia 100f and 160s.
    Like I said, you can import it yourself - if you want to pay the price.

    10 sheets of 4x5 100NC - ¥8,424 - per this site that's $105.89. 160NS, same price.

    Shipping isn't as bad I'd expect though. Surface mail, 2 months transit, isn't bad at all at ¥770 or another $9.68. EMS, whatever that is, insured and trackable to North Amercica is ¥1200 or $15.

    Kodak at B&H for comparison is $26.50 for Ektar, $29.95 for Portra 400 and $32.50 for Potra 160. Those are 10 sheet boxes though so double for comparison.

    So Fuji from Japan is just about double the price of Kodak from New York. Not as crazy as I seemed to recall, but plenty expensive enough to leave me shooting Kodak.

    20 sheets Astia QL, ¥13,650 - $171.59. Hey, only about $8.50 a shot not including shipping. No thanks. I like Astia but E100G is very good film and in stock at B&H for $3.50 a shot ($34.95/10) For that price I can load the holders, and take two in case dust ruins one and still be money ahead.

  9. #19
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    You can get Fuji 4x5 160 Pro S, Provia 100F and Velvia 50, 100 and 100F from Bluemoon Camera.

    http://www.bluemooncamera.com/invent...500&deptID=566

  10. #20
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony-S View Post
    You can get Fuji 4x5 160 Pro S, Provia 100F and Velvia 50, 100 and 100F from Bluemoon Camera.

    http://www.bluemooncamera.com/invent...500&deptID=566
    Thanks for the link. The transparency films are available many places, but not the 160. I'm more than happy with Kodak Portra 400, but it's good to have options. The coolest thing on their site for me is that they have a bigger selection at a lower price of 120 film on spools modified to work in 620 cameras. I have an old Kodak Duaflex my fiance got me for Christmas that I play around with for box camera Holga-esque fun sometimes.

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