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  1. #11
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Duplexing with an incident meter is a good way to find the basic reference point.

    Retract the dome, so your meter is flat faced,Meter with the meter pointed directly at the main light and then pointed at the camera, average the two readings.

    Past your reference point it's all pretty subjective, all about what you want. (That's actually true for any metering method.)
    I agree with Mark entirely, I've been using this method for more than thirty years it's great, and don't worry too much if you don't have a flat plane incidental light receptor it isn't absolutely necessary it still works very well with a normal incidental light dome.
    Ben

  2. #12
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    I've never used an incident meter so can't comment on that, but I would bring some filters. A UV, warming, and cooling filter. This makes a big difference for Velvia IMO.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I agree with Mark entirely, I've been using this method for more than thirty years it's great, and don't worry too much if you don't have a flat plane incidental light receptor it isn't absolutely necessary it still works very well with a normal incidental light dome.
    There was a point where I had never heard of duplexing, now I use it for almost everything important other than flash & studio work. It's that good.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14
    ITD
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    I'll have to give it a try. I can emulate a flat plane on my meter by retracting the dome. What does it give you that a straight incident reading with the dome pointed at the camera won't do?
    Last edited by ITD; 03-02-2012 at 11:02 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ITD View Post
    Hi, I've been experiementing with colour slides so that I can at least get some reasonable shots during a visit to India later in the year (great time to start given the Kodak news today )

    I started using incident metering of random subjects and bracketing - just got the test shots back from the lab and it looks like box speed with incident metering gives pretty good basic results for daytime use, both in good sun and slightly overcast conditions. I did note however that in some cases, underexposing some daylight shots by about a stop gives a nice evening-like 'golden hour' effect, and that got me wondering about corrections I need to think about.

    If the light was actually like that at the time, I figure that the incident meter value would ensure that the resultant picture was overexposed, am I right? Would I need to compensate for the meter's lack of discrimination to ensure the shot looked as I wanted it in this way?

    I'm trying to think of how I would calculate what sort of correction to use in all sorts of circumstances and not getting it quite yet. Hope you can help.

    Thanks
    Paul
    India. Travel. Slide film. Exposure.

    If you have the time, incident meter as others suggest. But if you're looking for more opportunistic shots, then your camera is going to make a difference. A modern SLR with matrix metering and spot option would be ideal especially if you can afford to bracket. Add in a warming filter or 2 81a, b). That's what the pros did with equipment designed for that purpose. Just a thought.

  6. #16
    ITD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristophanes View Post
    A modern SLR with matrix metering and spot option would be ideal
    Yes, it would probably be the best quality option however my F90X is a bit heavy and bulky for this trip - it'll be a fair amount of travelling around and living out of a rucksack, so I prefer the rangefinders. Thanks for the idea though, I might drag it out for some stuff nearer to home.


    Quote Originally Posted by Aristophanes View Post
    India. Travel. Slide film. Exposure.
    Is this a form of tagging?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ITD View Post
    Yes, it would probably be the best quality option however my F90X is a bit heavy and bulky for this trip - it'll be a fair amount of travelling around and living out of a rucksack, so I prefer the rangefinders. Thanks for the idea though, I might drag it out for some stuff nearer to home.

    Is this a form of tagging?
    I was just using the nouns as you ordered your ideas. Sometimes these technical threads forget that the subject matter make a big difference in the capture technique. When I think of India I think of people and places photos. The latter can be incident, but the former....you may not have that much time for incident metering.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ITD View Post
    I'll have to give it a try. I can emulate a flat plane on my meter by retracting the dome. What does it give you that a straight incident reading with the dome pointed at the camera won't do?
    Yes, retracted dome is a near perfect emulation of flat.

    Well now that you've asked.

    Duplexing is actually the direct predecessor of domed metering and setting exposure is always a compromise based on what's important in the composition.

    For "front lit subjects" flat duplexed results and single reading extended dome readings will normally agree.

    For "back lit subjects" duplexing provides a very reliable way to balance the competing subject brightness levels.

    As you know all our subjects aren't just directly front lit or directly back lit. As the main light source starts to get behind your subject a single reading extended dome reading becomes much less reliable at creating a good compromise and the background can go quickly into over exposure and be lost.

    Duplexing provides a workable compromise regardless of where the main light is.

    I use both methods but whenever I have any doubts I fall back to duplexed readings.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Yes, retracted dome is a near perfect emulation of flat.

    Well now that you've asked.

    Duplexing is actually the direct predecessor of domed metering and setting exposure is always a compromise based on what's important in the composition.

    For "front lit subjects" flat duplexed results and single reading extended dome readings will normally agree.

    For "back lit subjects" duplexing provides a very reliable way to balance the competing subject brightness levels.

    As you know all our subjects aren't just directly front lit or directly back lit. As the main light source starts to get behind your subject a single reading extended dome reading becomes much less reliable at creating a good compromise and the background can go quickly into over exposure and be lost.

    Duplexing provides a workable compromise regardless of where the main light is.

    I use both methods but whenever I have any doubts I fall back to duplexed readings.
    By retracting the dome you are using a flat plane and restricting the acceptance angle of the meter so it can only "see" what you are pointing it at without being effected by the surroundings with my meter a Sekonic L-358 with the dome retracted I point it from the subject to the camera and take a meter reading then press the memory button next I point the meter at the light source take another meter reading and press the memory button again, then all you do is press the average button and set that reading on your camera, this method is also good to use in the studio with studio strobes to calculate the contrast ratio between each flash head on the subject.
    Ben

  10. #20

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    Suppose there's late afternoon night illuminating your subject. What I first look for is if he/she is wearing anything that would reflect strong light. If not, then you can simply shoot at the exposure recommended by the incident meter and then if you want to tone it down a little bit, you can do it at the printing/scanning step.

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