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  1. #1
    ITD
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    Question about metering colour slides

    Hi, I've been experiementing with colour slides so that I can at least get some reasonable shots during a visit to India later in the year (great time to start given the Kodak news today )

    I started using incident metering of random subjects and bracketing - just got the test shots back from the lab and it looks like box speed with incident metering gives pretty good basic results for daytime use, both in good sun and slightly overcast conditions. I did note however that in some cases, underexposing some daylight shots by about a stop gives a nice evening-like 'golden hour' effect, and that got me wondering about corrections I need to think about.

    If the light was actually like that at the time, I figure that the incident meter value would ensure that the resultant picture was overexposed, am I right? Would I need to compensate for the meter's lack of discrimination to ensure the shot looked as I wanted it in this way?

    I'm trying to think of how I would calculate what sort of correction to use in all sorts of circumstances and not getting it quite yet. Hope you can help.

    Thanks
    Paul

  2. #2
    fotch's Avatar
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    The meter reports what the exposure should be for a normal shot. You can adjust your camera as needed to render the look you want. Others may have a better way or better explanation. HTH
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  3. #3
    ITD
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    OK, I take it that means my premise was correct - that using the incident reading in the early evening with the lovely golden light would make it look 'normal', i.e. overexposed compared to what I can see.

    Can anyone give me any help in terms of learning what corrections I'd need to make to get this right under various conditions? Does anyone have rules of thumb that can be applied here?

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    The best way is to memorize the exposures for each situation. You will still use your light meter then, but you will have enough judgment to tell if you need to make any manual adjustments.

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    ITD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Araakii View Post
    The best way is to memorize the exposures for each situation
    That's a shame - I've got a terrible memory! OK, so I've got one scenario pretty much in the bag then - underexpose one stop for golden early evening light.

    Are there any others that people already use?
    Last edited by ITD; 03-02-2012 at 05:20 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
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    Incidental metering is magic If you read this I think it will help explain your question http://www.sekonic.com/Classroom/Met...Reflected.aspx
    Ben

  7. #7
    ITD
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    Thanks benjiboy, that explains the situation for 'normal' light, but if the light falling on the subject is lower and you wish to show that lower light in the picture then some form of underexposure is required, unless I've got that wrong. What I'm looking for is any corrections that I can use to get me started. I'll obviously do my own testing for as many situations as I can fit in, but the effectiveness of that approach is often hampered by time available, prevailing weather conditions, etc.

    Maybe I just need to stick to spot metering, but I have trouble with that unless there are extremes in the scene (such as stuff I'd want to place on Zone VIII) and testing that suffers from the same time / weather problems as above.

  8. #8
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ITD View Post
    Thanks benjiboy, that explains the situation for 'normal' light, but if the light falling on the subject is lower and you wish to show that lower light in the picture then some form of underexposure is required, unless I've got that wrong. What I'm looking for is any corrections that I can use to get me started. I'll obviously do my own testing for as many situations as I can fit in, but the effectiveness of that approach is often hampered by time available, prevailing weather conditions, etc.

    Maybe I just need to stick to spot metering, but I have trouble with that unless there are extremes in the scene (such as stuff I'd want to place on Zone VIII) and testing that suffers from the same time / weather problems as above.
    I understand, but in order to do that but what a lot of people who shoot slide film don't appreciate is because it's reversal film the exposure corrections are in reverse if you want a darker slide reduce exposure by a third to half a stop, and increase by the same amounts for a lighter result, from my experience trying to apply The Zone System to colour reversal film because of it's small latitude is all but impossible because a correction of a third of a stop can make a hell of difference in the slides density if you start using Zones which are in one stop increments you're in deep trouble.
    Ben

  9. #9
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    Duplexing with an incident meter is a good way to find the basic reference point.

    Retract the dome, so your meter is flat faced,Meter with the meter pointed directly at the main light and then pointed at the camera, average the two readings.

    Past your reference point it's all pretty subjective, all about what you want. (That's actually true for any metering method.)
    Last edited by markbarendt; 03-02-2012 at 07:11 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Not quite enough coffee yet this morning.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #10

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    Although I rarely use transparency film I recall that as mentioned it requires accurate metering. The daylight films are balanced for approximately 5000-5500 degrees Kelvin. The color temperature will vary especially in the morning and late afternoon when the light is more "red" as well as the latitude of the location and weather conditions. Correcting for the color temperature requires a special meter and filters which in most cases would be over-kill. Slight under exposure will give more saturated colors and the opposite for over exposure. I think the easiest approach especially when traveling would be as suggested to take an incident reading and bracket. A one stop difference is half or double the exposure and that may be too much depending on the latitude of the film.

    Take some practice rolls before you go and record what you do so you can compare your results. Also, have the film processed by a good lab. One that doesn't do much may be using old worn out chemicals or other less than desirable techniques.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

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