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  1. #1

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    Leaving A Partially Shot Roll of Professional Film in the Camera: OK or Not?

    With the passing of Kodachrome, I have, over the course of the last several years begun shooting d.....l for some of my color work. That said, for archival purposes, I have, when shooting subjects of particular interest, also often times shot the same image(s) on analog, specifically E100G and/or E100VS. My issue: Often times I may not finish an entire roll of film, so I end up rewinding the partial roll, making down the number of exposures, and reloading the film at a later date. Needless to say, this is an obvious nuisance; it is also wastes frames (a precautionary measure on my part). The question(s): Is is necessary to remove "professional" film from the camera if the film would otherwise sit in the camera for several weeks? Is there a limit to how long it would be safe to leave the film in the camera?

  2. #2
    fotch's Avatar
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    I would try to keep it down to a year or less, couple of months would be better, couple of weeks, not a problem.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Just keep the cameras with half finished rolls away from temperature and humidity extremes.

    Room temperature should be fine on most days in Burnaby .

    I am assuming you are speaking about 35mm film.

    Of course, this ties up a camera body.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4
    clayne's Avatar
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    Only an issue with medium format in that it makes loading reels slightly more funky where the roll had paused. Otherwise no issues.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #5

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    I've kept Portra in the camera for several months without a problem, although changes will appear it you go too long, especially if the film is exposed to high temperatures. In a cool environment, six months will probably be safe. I've also kept exposed Ektachorme around for a couple of months without a problem, but that was years ago.

  6. #6
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Well, my personal choice is to never reload a roll.

    In other words, if I am done and have concerns for the latent image or film expiration... I'll rewind and process.

    If I feel like leaving a loaded camera on the shelf, I'll do just that.

    But I don't like risking the film for scratches "twice". And I don't like risking double-exposures. When I look in the kit for a roll of film, I don't have to check to see if I wrote a number on the leader.

  7. #7

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    I'd agree with comments so far....a reasonable period, in reasonable conditions is fine, in my humble experience.

    But, if the pics are very important or irreplaceable, best to loose a frame or two and get them processed. Or, to be more economical and, as was suggested to me, have a list of those casual, trial or record-type shots which you never get round to taking, and use any spare frames for these.



 

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