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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedidiah Smith View Post
    OK, thank you. That kind of mirrors my thoughts, I guess, so I will just use what they still make, and for my purposes, that will be Fuji Velvia.

    That done, does anyone have a good link to a comparison article on the 3 Velvias, or some personal experience for me to go off to decide which to go with for an order?
    Yes, I could buy a roll of each and try them together - perhaps a worthwhile $60 experiment that I may do, but if anyone has some field advice on the 3 from your experience, I'll gladly take it!
    Thanks,
    Jed
    Note, Fuji produces film in Japan that it discontinued here, such as 220 Astia and Velvia. I just picked some up and asked the vendor (Japan Exposures) whether these were old stock or are still produced. I was told they are still produced. If that is so, I am hopeful Fuji won't cease production anytime soon. Also, Fuji came out fairly recently with a new film camera - a 6x7/6x7 collapsible lens rangefinder - in 2010 I think. You can still buy them new. Not a guarantee or reliable predictor, but Fuji did much better than Kodak in terms of diversifying. Finally, Fuji makes its own E-6 chemicals, which are still sold in 5L home kits everywhere but N. America.

  2. #12

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    Velvia has a very narrow latitude, and it can give quite bizarre colors if exposure is not right on. There will be a learning curve. During that time, bracket and pay attention to the results.

  3. #13

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    I can tell you this: I just did my part to support Fuji's E-6 materials. I ordered several rolls of Provia 100F yesterday. Looking forward to shooting it as soon as I finish the roll of Velvia 100 that's in the camera right now.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  4. #14

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    Awesome on the E6 purchase! We'll give it the best run we can while they make it, right? And thanks for the advice on bracketing when I start. I've shot the old stuff before, back in Alaska, but that was several years ago now, and I am sure I'm quite rusty. Plus the light is different down here, way more intense and contrasty.

  5. #15

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    I know I might catch some flack for saying this from the crowd that uses the totally manual cameras, but I'm gonna say it anyway... Matrix meters in modern film SLRs are actually quite good and are a lot harder to fool with tricky lighting situations than the older center-weighted meters or manual cameras. Bracketing isn't as important with the matrix meters as it was back in the center-weighted metering days.

    My son should be getting his new-to-him SLR Wednesday. I asked him if he wanted prints to share with friends or slides to project so we would have the right film when it came in... He did not hesitate in his answer...He wants slides. We can always get a print from a slide. It's harder to get a slide from a print or negative.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  6. #16
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Velvia 50: Very, very contrasty; rate at EI40 in 35mm; as-is for MF and LF, diffuse light. Polarise in diffuse light.
    Velvia 100: Contrast as for 50, uber-saturated; very pure whites and stark reds; rate at EI80 in 35mm, as is for MF, LF.
    Any idea why only the 35mm version of these would be slightly less sensitive to light?


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  7. #17

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    Velvia 50 is my favourite film for landscapes and particularly if there is a good floral display.
    I avoid shooting people on it though as they always seem to have some bad fake tan gone wrong...
    Provia is very neutral and great for portraits and anything where the highly saturated Velvia look is not wanted.

  8. #18

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    Their slide Film mailers have an exp. date of 12/31/2013 on them.
    http://store.uniquephoto.com/e/index...600006359.html

    I use the mailers all the time. Less then a week turn around.

    Here is the Fujifilm GF670 Camera

    http://www.adorama.com/FJGF670.html

  9. #19

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    Those mailers have Dwayne's address on them. It's not surprising the turn-around is so fast.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  10. #20

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    Jan 2012
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    I've been shooting 35mm Velvia for several years. I rate Velvia 50 at ASA 50 and Velvia 100 at ASA 125, I don't know why. I can't comment on the 100F version. I have no problem with center-weighted meters; I only use a very limited aperture range, so I've gotten pretty good at just "eyeballing" the scene and knowing sort of what the exposure should be, even before I meter.

    Also, this may sound weird, but I've used both Velvia 50 and 100 extensively for urban night shooting. It does suprisingly well! I love the strange colors that come from mixed artificial lighting. In my experience, you can get away without worrying about reciprocity if you stay under a minute or two. I don't use a meter for night shooting, so I try to bracket, but most of the time I'm too lazy.

    I use E6 for probably 90% of what I do, but I'm not hopeful for the future. If and when E6 dies for good, I'll proably switch to C41

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