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  1. #21

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    Ah, thanks for all the tips as I get back into this. I will try some "ISO bracketing" then - see what I like best, anywhere from 80 to 125 and try to look at the subtle differences in shadow and highlight details.
    As far as the future - well, I guess all we can do is those of us who like color positives just have to keep shooting it until we no longer can, if that ever does happen...

  2. #22
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    As far as the future - well, I guess all we can do is those of us who like color positives just have to keep shooting it until we no longer can, if that ever does happen...

    That's right!
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  3. #23
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    Fuji Pro slide film is in no way inferior to Kodak I.M.O. they are amazing, and aren't just to be regarded as a stop gap replacement for Kodak ones, I just got four rolls of 120 Velvia 100 back from the lab a couple of days ago and after I had mounted them when I projected them on a 50" square screen for a few of my friends they had them gasping.
    Ben

  4. #24

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    I love Fuji's E6 offerings ... I've been shooting them almost exclusively whenever I choose to shoot slide.
    And the fact that it is relatively cheap to process here ($10AUD to process, I scan myself) has encouraged me to shoot more, mainly in 6x7 where they become mini photos. I love Astia in particular for people - they just render skin tones so beautifully.

    I need to do some studio shooting with it to see how it goes.

  5. #25
    ektachrome's Avatar
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    hope fuji keep going
    i love velvia 50!
    however
    i have stockpiled lots of e100 g and vs.
    When any film is discontinued, i buy at least 6 rolls of it and freeze.
    at the moment i have 6 rolls kodachrome 64, same for 200 and 25.
    Same for edupe, plus x, e200, 320t, 160t, 64, 64t

  6. #26
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I haven't used Kodak slide film for over twenty years, I used to prefer the Agfa Pro slide films, and in the last ten years or so I've used Fuji Pro slide films, it's probably my fault that Kodak have ceased production of them
    Ben

  7. #27
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Any idea why only the 35mm version of these would be slightly less sensitive to light?

    Steve.

    Not so much less sensitive to light, but the smaller format puts the squeeze on a scene that is bedevilled by tonal / contrast extremes. In the MF and LF formats, the tonal range is spread out and you actually can get away with some situations (but not universally so!) with contrast on the margin when it would (and does) absolutely balse up in the small format. I am not deriding nor advocating a mass shift from 35mm — I wouldn't do that myself: I printed fine art photographs to the Ilfochrome process for more than 16 years and problems with contrast in scenes that just had to be shot at the time were the bane of life. The point is more care and variation is required exposing Velvia in 35mm, even though care must also be exercised in MF and LF whenever contrast of the scene is known to exceed the range of the film, only in 35mm the tipping point will be more obvious and potentially ruinous. If you must shoot a contrasty scene, move up in the format. Extensive variables in separate metering methodology in MF and LF can also greatly assist over onboard 35mm metering. The basic premise of Velvia is that it will deliver the best imaging in the target light conditions it was designed for. It's your own fault if you shoot it in adverse conditions and cannot see a darned thing for swatches of black.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #28

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    All 3 Velvias are very different and you should do a side-by-side comparison of all 3 if possible. In fact, you should also compare 50 pushed to 100 to the actual 100-speed Velvias - you may find you prefer it in some situations (I do).

    That said, Velvia 50 is essentially the original Velvia introduced in 1990 and IMO by far the best for nature and landscapes. Here's a thread with more details of my experiences:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum40/7...0-vs-100f.html

    As far as its continued availability, Fuji has become notoriously hard to figure out. I'd guess Velvia 50 would be the last to go, since it was reintroduced due to demand over the 100's, but who knows.

  9. #29

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    The whole idea of a "best" film is BS. One man's medicine is another man's poison. Depends on what
    you are shooting, how you intend to print it, and what look you like. Fuji had the bases pretty well
    covered until they discontinued Astia, the best balanced and least contrasty of their chrome films.
    It was perhaps the most cooperative from a printing standpoint, but didn't sell all that well because
    it didn't look as snappy on a lightbox. E100G Kodak is the only other analogous chrome film, and now
    it's been disc too. But I too have had to make Cibachromes from Velvia, and it wasn't a very forgiving combination!

  10. #30

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    While we are on the topic, has anyone heard anything out of Japan regarding Astia? Some say that it's still in production, some say it's finished and whatever is out on store shelves is all that's left ...
    I have stocked up on it but I'd like to ensure that it is still readily available before possibly stocking up on more and filling my freezer full of Astia ...

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