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  1. #1
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Kodak Gold in D-76/T-Max developer

    Hello-
    I have some Kodak Gold that I would like to experiment by developing in D-76 or in T-Max developer. Does anyone have an ideas as to what developing times I should use? Has anyone had any success with this?

    Thanks,

    Patrick
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
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    You'll have better success using in a higher contrast developer such as D-72/Dektol. It's been years since I've done it, you'll need to experiment for time. You will also need to print on high contrast paper or filtering for decent prints, grade 4-5 are best.
    Rick A
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    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    While I can't give you a developing time, I did try this with Superia 200 once, and I got negs that could be scanned, but printed very poorly. The orange RA-4 mask that's built into the film base acts as a very low contrast filter.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  4. #4

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    I would imagine you can negate the effects of the orange mask if you use a dichroic enlarger and dial in the opposite filters?

  5. #5
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newcan1 View Post
    I would imagine you can negate the effects of the orange mask if you use a dichroic enlarger and dial in the opposite filters?
    Well, adding yellow and magenta is to 'remove' blue and green, which is what the paper is sensitive to. With the mask being orange, I don't know if there is enough blue and green left to be removed to have a proper paper exposure.
    I've never heard of anyone that was entirely successful of getting great black and white prints from C41 color neg film processed in b&w chemistry. Unless you had Kodak Panalure, of course, which was panchromatically sensitive to light, same as color papers, and had to be printed in total darkness.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #6

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    You raise an interesting point: using panchromatic paper. The easiest way out here would be to print the negatives on color paper.

    But regarding my original suggestion: I believe that when you use multicontrast b&w filters, yes, orange may be low contrast, but magenta is higher contrast. I think a typical dichroic head could almost certainly provide the filtration to bring the contrast up. I would use a color analyser, get a reading of say a grade three filtration with a true b&w neg, then put the c-41 b&w neg in and adjust the filtration for the same reading. Probably a dichroic head would have enough filtration.

  7. #7
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newcan1 View Post
    You raise an interesting point: using panchromatic paper. The easiest way out here would be to print the negatives on color paper.

    But regarding my original suggestion: I believe that when you use multicontrast b&w filters, yes, orange may be low contrast, but magenta is higher contrast. I think a typical dichroic head could almost certainly provide the filtration to bring the contrast up. I would use a color analyser, get a reading of say a grade three filtration with a true b&w neg, then put the c-41 b&w neg in and adjust the filtration for the same reading. Probably a dichroic head would have enough filtration.
    There's only one way to find out. I remember how our master printer at the photo lab I used to work at would smile at me and say, 'you know, if you ever need any b&w prints made from color negs, let me know'... I never took him up on his offer, but decided that he must have been using Panalure. With C-41 film in b&w film, you obviously don't have the colors to deal with, but the orange mask instead, and a silver image that is probably not of the same density as a normal b&w negative, but don't quote me on that.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #8
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    RickA is correct. For some reason C-41 types 'need' powerful B&W developers if you are to attain sufficient contrast. - David Lyga



 

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