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  1. #111
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    All film emulsions change with time. The shift has nothing to do with the dye forming reaction itself. It does not even matter with regular color films.

    This is why B&W paper and film change!

    PE

  2. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    All film emulsions change with time. The shift has nothing to do with the dye forming reaction itself. It does not even matter with regular color films.

    This is why B&W paper and film change!

    PE
    Ohhhhhhhhhh.

    That makes sense; any fog already present on the film will cause the dye forming reaction to go AWOL and render a different colour, dependent on which colour-sensitive layer of the film is fogged? (with regards to Kodachrome)

    -R

  3. #113
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    Yes. And it is far more complex than there is room on APUG to give the total answer!

    PE

  4. #114
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    Sorry that I don't know half the tech some of you are talking about but I wanted to say something after reading most of the posts in this thread.

    Kodachrome was gone before I had a chance to try it. What I didn't really see addressed in this thread is how in hell does one make at least a kodachrome like film, because obviously we aren't getting any! I completely admire that the k-14 process has been replicated though, at least in most part to get a result... thats great. Fantastic job.
    All that really matters in the end is the image, not what your using to create it.

  5. #115
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    Kodachrome film is a B&W film with at least 9 different emulsions sensitive to Red, Green and Blue light and these emulsions are able to tell them apart and reproduce the original colors. The coatings are very thin to give good sharpness and the emulsions are very fine grained but still give good speed and grain. The coating is so complex than only Kodak remained active in this field even though Fuji once made a compatible film, as did Konica in Japan.

    PE

  6. #116
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    Thanks for posting that stuff Stephen.

  7. #117
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    Thanks.

    So basically its good luck trying to make a film like that. Handy to know. 9 emulsions wow.
    All that really matters in the end is the image, not what your using to create it.

  8. #118
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    C41 films are more complex than that!

    PE

  9. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    C41 films are more complex than that!

    PE
    Correct me if I am wrong, but in the giant Kodachrome thread didn't we discuss taking three shots with a tri-color separation on panchro film, then processing the three emulsions as the three layers in Kodachrome, and placing them in registration to create a full color transparency.

    Hence my original interest in the one shot camera.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  10. #120
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    Yes we did Michael, and in several other threads as well! This has come up over and over again. It does work and was one route to making color transparencies about 100 years ago.

    PE



 

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