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  1. #131

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    Magnificent! Any chance of copy-pasting everything posted on Facebook here? In things like these, reviving dying information etc., I believe in "open source".

    Hey, it would be simple to build a very small re-exposure device. It would include a small stepper motor to advance the film strips at a constant, adjustable speed, and selectable red/blue LED light source very close to the point where the film is driven from. This way, the exposure can be controlled to very high precision with very small lab space requirements and easy&quick operation, with no limit for film length whatsoever. I bet there are many electronic/mechanical tinkerers like me at APUG who could do this.
    Ive created a wiki here for this very purpose, its called Kodachromia
    you can find it here at http://kodachromia.wikia.com/ i can make you an administrator if you like, to allow you full access.

  2. #132

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    bump, seems to have gone dead!

  3. #133

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    bump.
    all this discussion seems to have stopped?

  4. #134

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    This should be front-page news on the major news outlets!

    <bump.>

    -R

  5. #135
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    This is great news but, since the supply of viable Kodachrome that can be shot and developed into photographs is getting smaller every day, we would be just as well talking about the breeding habits of the dodo bird.

    I would love to try developing Kodachrome at home. I like to experiment with things like this. I would have a lot of fun trying to invent my Kodachrome developing machine. I love to tinker and invent things but what use would it have? There just is no more Kodachrome. All my experiments and all my inventions, even if they worked perfectly would be for naught.

    Theoretically, it has been proposed that, if there is demand, Kodak could start making Kodachrome again but that's all just theory. There would have to be a HUGE swell in demand for that to happen. It's about as likely as me hitting the lottery tomorrow. It could happen but it ain't gonna' happen.

    Yes, I agree that this should be news but few people beyond the membership of APUG understand what it means to develop Kodachrome at home and, of those who do, few care.

    The, let's just assume that lightning strikes and Kodak starts making Kodachrome tomorrow. Would anybody develop it at home? No, if there is that much demand for the film, all those businesses that have K-Labs would be taking them out of mothballs. I might have a chance to develop and market my home Kodachrome machine but, at what cost?

    I would love for Kodachrome to come back again but I'm not holding my breath.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  6. #136
    hrst's Avatar
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    Randy,

    There is still one point in practicing the process; that is, planning to make your own Kodachrome type of film in the future.

    Because the fact that the Kodachrome process is complex but the film is comparably simple, the process needs to be there first before it makes any sense to start R&D on the film.

    There are many APUGers who have done their own B&W emulsions. It's just a matter of going further. A lot further.

    Of course, it should be stressed that it will be a very very long road, but it is not impossible.

    I consider it from this viewpoint; if I'm ever going to try making color film, it will probably be something like Kodachrome because of the simplicity, and then the process must be there. Of course, at that point the development process suddenly becomes the more simple side of the whole story.

  7. #137
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    Ide rather process the film than try and make the emulsion! From what i have head and read making the emulsion is not a simple feat. the principle is simple but the engineering behind it is actually quite delicate and complex.
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  8. #138

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    Ide rather process the film than try and make the emulsion! From what i have head and read making the emulsion is not a simple feat. the principle is simple but the engineering behind it is actually quite delicate and complex.
    Yes, quite true, but as PE pointed out here, is that C41 films are far more complex than kodachrome!
    And i would believe that too, E6 films are probably just as complex as C41 too, since there is a complex arrangement of couplers in the film itself.

    Who knows?
    If a relatively simple K-14 type process can be acheived with constant results, it may move film manufacturers such as Ilford to do a run of a kodachrome type emulsion, who knows?
    Either way, ive gotten over kodachrome not being available anymore, but im keen to see E6 going, as im starting to shoot on E6, which as a young photographer, have never even touched before.

  9. #139
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    In order of film complexity from lowest to highest:

    Kodachrome, E6 films, C41 films.

    In order of process complexity from lowest to highest:

    C41, E6, Kodachrome.

    Any hints in this to you all?

    BTW, all chemicals have been discontinued, all processing and film manufacture is discontinued. And yet... And yet, Steve has managed to make the process work. The complexity of Kodachrome is similar to the complexity of Polaroid instant products. And the situation in some regards is similar to TIP. And yet, there is no Azo paper, but I can make a work alike and Steve can reproduce (resurrect) the Kodachrome process from scratch.

    There is a lesson to be learned here for everyone.

    PE

  10. #140

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post

    There is a lesson to be learned here for everyone.

    PE
    I think I've heard that lesson.. it's called the, "get off your butt and do something about it or quit your bitching" lesson.
    - Bill Lynch



 

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