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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post

    I can't imagine how it could be done in regular hand tanks. Spiraling film on and off the reels, once wet, would be nearly impossible. You can't re-expose the film correctly through the emulsion side only then on the base side only with the film on reels.
    If it were me I would create a 'stretcher' or rack where the film strip gets mounted all flat out. Then a set of long troughs, or tall cylindrical tanks that the stretcher would be immersed in. You could easily control the reexposure by side and light color by placing the rack on a light bar.

    Although I'm sure you would have to process in darkness, it could be an assembly line type of affair. Drop in tank1 for time, pull the rack out and on to light bar 1, then on down the line.
    - Bill Lynch

  2. #42
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    I have some ideas on this though regarding easier means to Kodachrome type results using B&W film. I would be interested in your source for Color Developers and your source for Couplers
    PE ,

    Do you aware presence of www.alibaba.com ? If not , have a look at there . I dont know what to look for but with your ability , I think you can find may be all of the chemicals. Dont miss it.

    Best ,
    Umut

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    PE ,

    Do you aware presence of alibaba ? If not , have a look at there . I dont know what to look for but with your ability , I think you can find may be all of the chemicals. Dont miss it.

    Best ,
    Umut
    Yes your correct, a quick google of the chemiclas Steve used comes up with numerous Alibaba results, some of them such as the cyan developer are expensive though at $2500 per ton MOQ!

  4. #44
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Nzoomeed,

    Its ton means 1000 kilograms or 2500 pounds. If you search Sigma Aldrich site , you find , you can buy maximum 1 kilograms with that money.

    Best ,
    Umut

  5. #45
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Guys, I can state the following with just about 100% accuracy!

    1. Kodak will not bring back Kodachrome! Never, ever.

    2. Kodachrome can be processed by hand either in a tank or whatever method you choose as long as you can expose properly to Red and Blue. The evidence is in this thread.

    3. Kodachrome color developers go bad even in the absence of air as they are essentially a mixture of Oxidants and Reductants, and that is why the process was so difficult to control and why it had to run continuously. In our labs, when hand processing, the color developers were split into 2 parts - develper and coupler. They were mixed just before use.

    4. B&W film can be processed in Kodachrome chemistry to yield a color image by the method I described here at least 2 different times. You use 3 sheets of film to create 3 images which are then processed in 3 color developers using a reversal process. The laminated sheets (or roll film if you wish) then form a very beautiful and authentic Kodachrome image. It works. That is one of the ways we tested single layer color coatings..

    PE

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    ... essentially a mixture of Oxidants and Reductants
    Sort of sounds like the old RX chemistry we worked on.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Guys, I can state the following with just about 100% accuracy!

    1. Kodak will not bring back Kodachrome! Never, ever.

    2. Kodachrome can be processed by hand either in a tank or whatever method you choose as long as you can expose properly to Red and Blue. The evidence is in this thread.

    3. Kodachrome color developers go bad even in the absence of air as they are essentially a mixture of Oxidants and Reductants, and that is why the process was so difficult to control and why it had to run continuously. In our labs, when hand processing, the color developers were split into 2 parts - develper and coupler. They were mixed just before use.

    4. B&W film can be processed in Kodachrome chemistry to yield a color image by the method I described here at least 2 different times. You use 3 sheets of film to create 3 images which are then processed in 3 color developers using a reversal process. The laminated sheets (or roll film if you wish) then form a very beautiful and authentic Kodachrome image. It works. That is one of the ways we tested single layer color coatings..

    PE
    Ok, that does make sense using sheet film, but would only be suitable for scenery, unless you had a camera that could expose onto 3 seperate rolls of film simultaneously. This reminds me a bit of technicolor, although both are entirely different processes.
    As far as the kodachrome chemicals go, does this mean that the k-labs had the couplers and developers stored seperate?
    As that was the main thing with the k-labs, was no chemicals had to be prepeared and the sealed bag in box system was supposed to prevent oxidation.

  8. #48

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    Hi PE,

    What kind of b&w film is best for this purpose? TMax100/Plus-X/Tri-X/TMax400?

    ===

    You said, "4. B&W film can be processed in Kodachrome chemistry to yield a color image by the method I described here at least 2 different times. You use 3 sheets of film to create 3 images which are then processed in 3 color developers using a reversal process. The laminated sheets (or roll film if you wish) then form a very beautiful and authentic Kodachrome image. It works. That is one of the ways we tested single layer color coatings.."

  9. #49
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    This (highly interesting) thread is living testament to the power once exercised by Kodak's marketing department. The marketing personnel may all be dead and gone, but their legacy lives on.

    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  10. #50
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    ...You use 3 sheets of film to create 3 images which are then processed in 3 color developers using a reversal process.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nzoomed View Post
    ...This reminds me a bit of technicolor, although both are entirely different processes.
    Yes, it also reminds me of the technicolor process only without the imbibation part. I imagine three strips of film could be exposed through the correct filters in one camera just like a Technicolor camera. The technology is all there. Somebody would just have to put it all together.

    (Yeah, that's like wishing in one hand and sh*tting in the other... I know... )
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/



 

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