Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,939   Posts: 1,557,416   Online: 918
      
Page 9 of 39 FirstFirst ... 345678910111213141519 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 386
  1. #81

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Oregon
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    15
    So long as nobody is planning to shoot movies, none of the film strips will be longer than 6ft or so.
    It would be easy to construct a linear tank with support scaffolding inside to hold a full length 36 exposure 35mm or a roll of 120.
    Agitation would be a simple rocking side to side like those oscillating tabletop "wave" lamps.
    Color re-exposure could simply be by opening the lid and using an overhead lamp. To expose opposite side, simply open lid, flip the scaffolding over, expose, close lid and continue.
    Wash steps could be accomplished by plumbing the water direct to the tank on one end, and the drain at the other end.
    Similar tanks could be constructed for sheet film.

    Now, for process control, since we have no supply of control strips, it could be a simple matter of using the first 3-4 frames on a 35mm roll as the control. Every roll you shoot, take 3 or 4 shots of a color card as the first exposures on the roll. At process time, extract the leader and 6 more inches, process it as the control. Evaluate and correct for the deviations when you run the rest of the roll.

    I own a machine shop, do significant work with semiconductor and manufacturing companies, and am interested in building any equipment required for this, or other photography-related projects. (I do the same sort of thing for vintage Japanese motorcycles, another hobby of mine...)

    So if you have ideas, and can render a half-way decent dimensioned drawing (or even a CAD drawing if that's your skill level), I'm happy to take a look and at least estimate the production costs. Just zap me a PM and we'll take it from there.

  2. #82

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Oregon
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    15
    Also, if you don't have the "Z50" publication set (numbered 01 to 10), read them...they will explain the K14 process in depth, answering many questions.
    For the K-Labs in particular, Google for "K-Lab Theory Guide" and download it too. Gives specs such as film tension, speed, re-exposure guidelines, and much more data actually used to process the film.
    No sense reinventing any more than necessary, and Stephen certainly has led the way in making this happen. If there is enough genuine demand, there is enough collective knowledge here to make it a practical reality.

  3. #83

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    243
    All i know is if Dwaynes kept their lab equipment, you would think they would have been still able to process kodachrome using the chemistry Steve has used.
    In fact they should have had plenty of resources and knowledge required to do this since they had employed chemists to monitor the entire k-14 process.
    It still would have been a viable part of their business for a few more years if nothing else until all the remaining kodachrome stocks around the globe dried up.
    Even if the only did a few runs per year, it still would have been possible.
    Anyway processc22 in the UK has a banner on their site saying kodachrome is only sleeping, they claim they are wanting to experiment with processing Kodachrome in Colour, would be worth directing them to this thread here.

    Anyway, does anyone else agree that this new process be designated k-15?

    I think its a fitting name since its not going to be ever 100% the same as the k-14 process and the chemistry is obviously slightly different.

  4. #84
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,199
    Images
    65
    K-16!

    And, you cannot get the chemistry easily. Or inexpensively. Good luck guys.

    PE

  5. #85

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    243
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    K-16!

    And, you cannot get the chemistry easily. Or inexpensively. Good luck guys.

    PE
    Well pretty much all the chemicals that Steve has posted on facebook are available on Alibaba at a price.
    I cant comment on the "genuine" kodak chemicals though. There must be some differences.
    Its very possible someone with a good background of chemistry could synthesise the exact chemicals from these.
    Thats when it would be a great expense.
    If it does a good job with the chemicals Steve used, i would not worry, providing its archival stability proves to be good.

    I had a question for you regarding the long term archivability of kodachrome and the unique colours it produces due to the dye couplers being added.
    Is this because the couplers are a different nature to E6 films, or is it because the film is going through a strong chemical bath containing the couplers that the film itself gets a stronger concentration of dye compared to the small amount thats incorporated into a regular E6 film?
    Last edited by Nzoomed; 04-01-2012 at 11:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #86
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,620
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    K-16!

    And, you cannot get the chemistry easily. Or inexpensively. Good luck guys.

    PE
    Well, the way I see it, veil has been lifted, so to speak.

    Not to say that I'd attempt it but if I ever got a wild hare up my a$$, I might consider it some day
    I have equipment that can do the job. The chemistry is obtainable even if it is expensive and finicky.

    I don't even have a roll of film to process if I wanted to and I'm not about to try to get one just to play with film and chemicals. All I'm saying is that the the K-14 process has just taken a step up from "black magic" to mere "alchemy."
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  7. #87
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,380
    Images
    174
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    On the contrary Steve, you tell it like it is. In fact, if there was an award for APUG member of the year for outstanding achievement, I would recommend you! Good work on both counts. I would love to have one of those screens. Are you going to sell them?

    PE
    Ron I'm very flattered by you of all people saying that. I vote you as APUG member of the century! I am not going to sell the screens as I have nightmares about doing so. the thought of people coming back to me complaining the screens don't work because they don't register the film to it properly or they don't process their film correctly etc...etc

    I have however experimented in private with new screens that produced higher resolution, more accurate results. I would be more than happy to send u a screen or two as a sample so u can do the same process as me. Will send you a private message.
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  8. #88
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,611
    Images
    122
    I award you The First Annual APUG Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Excellence.

    (stolen from The Simpsons).


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #89
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,380
    Images
    174
    Can I please remind everyone there is no more kodachrome film being made at present and its not likely to be resurrected any time soon, As a man who still processes E-6 I think we should all be focusing our attention to E-6 and the buying and shooting that before we loose it like we have lost kodachrome.

    Now on a few other issues

    First thing to note for kodachrome development. The First developer I used for my results was a formula very similar to Ilford PQ Universal, (sorry Ron if this rings alarm bells to you) I mention this to give example on how I've butchered certain steps of the process to get a system that works. This being said its all working as a one shot process. Ive really got no way of testing replenishment rates etc and I Don't have enough chemistry and film to experiment with that. So I have no idea if a K-14 machine can be used. Also Im not sure if the developers in a k-14 machine are replenished by a part A part B mixing into working solution. My notes for the dye developers I use each state that the chemicals WILL NOT KEEP (not sure if this is true for the solutions A & B separately but once mixed they MUST BE USED.

    Secondly with no new film stocks ive seen heaps of older kodachrome films that were processed with slightly magenta or purple fogging from age to the base.... all kodachrome is now out of date. When looking at business somethings have to be taken into account, the cost of the process is a huge thing to take into account the chemicals are very expensive therefore the cost to the client will be very expensive...how much are people really willing to pay? secondly the huge issue more than this is the ammount of film on the market? theres no new stock ebing made and without a processing deadline people are likely to say YAY we can process our kodachrome but how many are actually likely to do so? and if they do once its processed then what? how are they going to get more?

    lastly please read the tech pubs on kodachrome, everything you could ever want to know is in them, kodak does not make kodachrome a secret in any way shape or form. You can find out anything you want to know from how to make the film, what processing temps and times (specific gravities) , printing the film, anything and everything required in developing down to film tension issues in a k-lab machine...

    Sorry to sound such a buzz kill I just don't want people thinking this little test is the birth of a new Kodachrome process...
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  10. #90

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    243
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    Can I please remind everyone there is no more kodachrome film being made at present and its not likely to be resurrected any time soon, As a man who still processes E-6 I think we should all be focusing our attention to E-6 and the buying and shooting that before we loose it like we have lost kodachrome.

    Now on a few other issues

    First thing to note for kodachrome development. The First developer I used for my results was a formula very similar to Ilford PQ Universal, (sorry Ron if this rings alarm bells to you) I mention this to give example on how I've butchered certain steps of the process to get a system that works. This being said its all working as a one shot process. Ive really got no way of testing replenishment rates etc and I Don't have enough chemistry and film to experiment with that. So I have no idea if a K-14 machine can be used. Also Im not sure if the developers in a k-14 machine are replenished by a part A part B mixing into working solution. My notes for the dye developers I use each state that the chemicals WILL NOT KEEP (not sure if this is true for the solutions A & B separately but once mixed they MUST BE USED.

    Secondly with no new film stocks ive seen heaps of older kodachrome films that were processed with slightly magenta or purple fogging from age to the base.... all kodachrome is now out of date. When looking at business somethings have to be taken into account, the cost of the process is a huge thing to take into account the chemicals are very expensive therefore the cost to the client will be very expensive...how much are people really willing to pay? secondly the huge issue more than this is the ammount of film on the market? theres no new stock ebing made and without a processing deadline people are likely to say YAY we can process our kodachrome but how many are actually likely to do so? and if they do once its processed then what? how are they going to get more?

    lastly please read the tech pubs on kodachrome, everything you could ever want to know is in them, kodak does not make kodachrome a secret in any way shape or form. You can find out anything you want to know from how to make the film, what processing temps and times (specific gravities) , printing the film, anything and everything required in developing down to film tension issues in a k-lab machine...

    Sorry to sound such a buzz kill I just don't want people thinking this little test is the birth of a new Kodachrome process...
    Yes i do completley agree whee you are coming from. However i do feel sorry for those that never got their film to Dwaynes in time, i was recently contacted by the person who has made a whole film dedicated to the space shuttle and its all shot on kodachrome http://www.shuttlelaunchfilm.com/
    He has films that he has not had processed and needs them done to complete his film. He is keeping them frozen in the mean time.
    It would be great to help such people out, its worth mentioning that Steve Mccurry has kept a stock of kodachrome waiting to be shot in his freezer for the day that processing may happen again.
    Ive got 15 rolls in my freezer that i bought from a photographer cheaply that he never got to shoot, im annoyed i never got the chance to shoot kodachrome myself.
    At least its given me an interest in analog photography again and im stocking up on as much ektachrome as i can afford before thats too late.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin