Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,283   Posts: 1,534,942   Online: 911
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11
    kb3lms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Reading, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    696
    Images
    5
    Hi Robert,

    I haven't used the Ektachrome but I am using 5207 250D movie negative film right now. If the film is listed as 100D, the 'D' stands for daylight. The other film I am starting to use is 5219 200T where the 'T' stands for Tungsten balance. So 100D would be a daylight balance film intended for outdoor use.

    WRT bulk loading, I have given up on the bulk loader path and just pull out a good arm's length of film off the spool in the darkroom, cut it and roll it into the cassette. It's just easier that way and you don't end up with an exposed tail at the end of the roll or scratches from the loader.

    I'd try and shoot as normal slide film and I would bet it would work just fine. The CN film works just like regular daylight negative film except the contrast is a little lower as CN films are intended for making positive film prints.

    The slightly different sprocket holes will not bother your camera one bit.

    -- Jason

  2. #12
    wildbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,386
    Images
    140
    Dude, its 100 speed daylight reversal film. No special filters needed. Shoot it as you would any other 100 speed e-6 film. Don't buy $1000 of it until you've sampled some.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mundelein, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    993
    Images
    1
    It's very hard to find short ends of 100D. In fact it's getting harder to buy 100D at all - the only remaining 35mm size is the 400ft roll on a core. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that Kodak canned up a master roll of it for some cinematographers that were demanding it, and once those all get sold, there will be no more. It's still pretty popular with the 16mm and 8/super-8 crowd but I'm betting it's virtually unused by 35mm cinematographers these days.

    At $475 for 400 feet I considered it no bargain at all compared to buying normal still camera film from Kodak... but now that it's the only reversal film left maybe that price doesn't seem so bad. But grab it while you can, like I said I bet once the frozen supply at Kodak is gone, it's gone. (Movie film is not given an expiration date - it's assumed to be a short path from Kodak to the camera to the lab - so they can and will just keep selling it for however long it is until it's gone, if my theory is correct.)

    If you send it off to a lab for processing, you should make sure they are OK with this (from the data sheet ):

    Note: KODAK EKTACHROME 100D Color Reversal Film 5285 / 7285 contains special sensitizing and filter dyes that improve color reproduction. Because these dyes are designed to rinse out of the film during processing, they will change the color of the first developer, the reversal bath, the final wash, and the final rinse. This solution discoloration is only cosmetic. It will not affect sensitometry or the quality of any Process E-6 film or control material. However, the solutions will cause splicing tape and processing equipment (rollers, racks, etc.) to have a pinkish color. The pink dye residue can easily be washed off processing equipment by following normal maintenance procedures.
    Duncan
    Last edited by frobozz; 03-30-2012 at 10:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mundelein, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    993
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by frobozz View Post
    It's very hard to find short ends of 100D. In fact it's getting harder to buy 100D at all - the only remaining 35mm size is the 400ft roll on a core. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that Kodak canned up a master roll of it for some cinematographers that were demanding it, and once those all get sold, there will be no more. It's still pretty popular with the 16mm and 8/super-8 crowd but I'm betting it's virtually unused by 35mm cinematographers these days.
    I'm surprised it took 9 months...

    http://motion.kodak.com/motion/About...0514/index.htm

    Duncan

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    152
    High Robert!

    This is an older thread, but if still of interest for you and assuming you can get your hands on a roll, buy one.

    First respool in complete Darkness with gloved hands to a smaller, bulk loader compatible roll at about 100 feet, freeze the “residual” main roll airtight sealed.

    So yes, shoot landscapes in your SLR, metering and filtering as you would Ektachrome pro 100 daylight, process as same, and you'll not be surprised
    This is valid with one exception, we are talking about a E100VS (vivid saturation). Good for Landscapes and everything that have a lot of blue color in, or need some extra punch, maybe not ideal for portraits. It`s not that deadly neutral as the ektachrome 100, pronouncing a bit more blue.

    Compare
    E100 http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/e27/e27.pdf
    E100VS http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe.../e163/e163.pdf
    100D http://www.zerelda.com/international...files/5285.pdf

    The 100D is / was virtually the same product as the E100VS, except the slightly different sprocket holes and different numbers/bar codes exposed to the border.

    Regards,
    Stefan

  6. #16
    destroya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    san jose
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    261
    just found this on amazon...

    http://www.amazon.com/2-Pack-Kodak-E...pd_sim_sbs_p_2

    so if i read this thread correctly, you can buy this, put it in your bulk roller and use it as slide film and then develop it in E-6 right? if so then this seems very interesting to me. so am I reading this thread correctly?

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    751
    You are reading the thread correctly, but the film in your link is Super 8 film, not 35mm. 35mm E100D only comes in 400 foot rolls. The best way to order the 35mm is to call up Kodak at 800-621-3456. They have the cheapest prices, and ship directly to you.
    "Panic not my child, the Great Yellow Father has your hand"--Larry Dressler

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mundelein, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    993
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by nickrapak View Post
    You are reading the thread correctly, but the film in your link is Super 8 film, not 35mm. 35mm E100D only comes in 400 foot rolls. The best way to order the 35mm is to call up Kodak at 800-621-3456. They have the cheapest prices, and ship directly to you.
    And for completeness' sake, the catalog number you want to order is 8673741 which is Kodak 5285 in 35mmx400 ft roll. The price in the US is $475.73, plus shipping and taxes. And you might want to hurry, this is literally an offer that is "good while supplies last" !

    Duncan

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mundelein, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    993
    Images
    1
    My roll arrived today, just one day later, shipped out of Carol Stream (near Chicago)... so maybe they have more of the 35mm stuff on hand than I thought, if it's stocked at the regional movie film depots.

    Duncan

  10. #20
    wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bruce Peninsula, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by frobozz View Post
    My roll arrived today, just one day later, shipped out of Carol Stream (near Chicago)... so maybe they have more of the 35mm stuff on hand than I thought, if it's stocked at the regional movie film depots.

    Duncan
    Or it means they have pushed it all out to the regional warehouses, to free up space in the central warehouse.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin