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  1. #1

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    need the facts on ektachrome 100d 35mm motion picture film as 'slide' film.

    Embarrassed that I don't know this and a little spooked that extensive web/site searches can't tell me what I need to know...

    I couldn't find any useful info or examples on the web that were intended as 'straight' photography or motion picture stuff, so if anybody knows of any tests, reviews, or galleries I'd like to take a look at what one can do with this film.

    The question: does this film behave as a 'regular' e-6 film if used as a film for, say, natural light landscape stuff? Can I use it as I'd used EPP or whatever? Or is there some difference that'll make the colors off? Does it have the same perforations as 'still' 35mm film, so I can bulk load it and shoot as normal? Is the contrast similar? Are any filters required? Any weird masking or backing? Does it scan well?

    I'm not looking for super-technical comments as to the minutiae of grain, contrast, etc. of kodak vs. fuji or ektachrome vs. kodachrome or whatever (but feel free to post them, what the heck, everything's useful for later seekers). More interested in the suitability as such. Beggars can't be choosers anymore, that period of history's over.

    I just want to know if I can use this while it's still around. Like I did ~2004-2010 with kodachrome, I'm going to try to shoot any ektachrome while I can, but the prices on the 35mm rolled stuff are soon going to be prohibitive.

    Help, thanks!
    Last edited by Robert Liebermann; 03-29-2012 at 02:54 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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    Robert J. Liebermann
    photos: http://rjl.us/photo
    Eureka Alaska/Vermillion Michigan USA

  2. #2
    wildbill's Avatar
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    motion picture perfs. yes, you should be able to use it in a still camera. filtration is the same when I've shot it. Will it be worth the trouble vs. buying fuji provia in cartridges? Probably not.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    Film photography? This term kills me. As if there's another kind!

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
    motion picture perfs. ... filtration is the same when I've shot it.
    Thanks - are MP perfs the same as 35mm for 'regular' cameras? ... Filtration the same as what?
    ................................................

    Robert J. Liebermann
    photos: http://rjl.us/photo
    Eureka Alaska/Vermillion Michigan USA

  4. #4
    McFortner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Liebermann View Post
    Thanks - are MP perfs the same as 35mm for 'regular' cameras?
    Yes, the spacing is the same for movie and photo film. 35mm film cameras got their start from cameras made to use the left over unshot film from movies. There may be a slight difference in only that some movie films have a rounded sprocket ends (__) vs. photographic film with it's 90 degree ends [__], but it will not bother your 35mm cameras at all.

  5. #5
    MDR
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    Ektachrome 100D is processed in Standard E6 chemicals and not ECN2 furthermore Ektachrome 100D does not have a Remjet backing so it can be be processed at home in E6. The perforation is different to still film B&H perforation (cine film) vs KS (Kodak perforation) (still film and Cine print film as well as Russian MP cameras) but since normal still cameras don't have a registration pin you shouldn't have any problems using it in your still camera

    Good Luck
    Dominik

  6. #6

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    Hi Umut, Dominik et al. - thanks for the info. Esp. RE: the short-end sellers! Will have to look into that. So now I understand what remjet backing is; and this doesn't have it so even better.

    I looked at the Kodak datasheets earlier, but as it seems entirely directed at motion picture use I was unsure if any things I'd need to know - I understand 'still' film well, but know nothing of cinema films. I was aware it's e-6, of course, so that's an indicator.

    The last thing I'm unsure of, and this is a big part, is if the film would appear as 'daylight' slide film as I know it. The only web examples I could find seem to be people using damaged or 'cross-processed' uses, which is OK but not what I'm looking for (yet!).

    So if anybody can tell me something like 'yes, shoot landscapes in your SLR, metering and filtering as you would Ekatachrome pro 100 daylight, process as same, and you'll not be surprised' that's what I'm looking for (feel free to copy/paste, even, if it's true). Or, 'don't use it without a xxx filter and even then it'll have a lime green cast and b;a bla bla' would tell me to rethink this. I just need to know if there's something 'different' from other e6 film here.

    I might save up and buy one of those long rolls just to prepare for the inevitable... I guess I'd have to build some sort of modified bulk loader for that size roll...

    The thing that confuses me is, if this can be shot as 'slide' film, why I can't find anything about that use on the web.
    ................................................

    Robert J. Liebermann
    photos: http://rjl.us/photo
    Eureka Alaska/Vermillion Michigan USA

  7. #7
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    Hi Robert,

    I haven't used the Ektachrome but I am using 5207 250D movie negative film right now. If the film is listed as 100D, the 'D' stands for daylight. The other film I am starting to use is 5219 200T where the 'T' stands for Tungsten balance. So 100D would be a daylight balance film intended for outdoor use.

    WRT bulk loading, I have given up on the bulk loader path and just pull out a good arm's length of film off the spool in the darkroom, cut it and roll it into the cassette. It's just easier that way and you don't end up with an exposed tail at the end of the roll or scratches from the loader.

    I'd try and shoot as normal slide film and I would bet it would work just fine. The CN film works just like regular daylight negative film except the contrast is a little lower as CN films are intended for making positive film prints.

    The slightly different sprocket holes will not bother your camera one bit.

    -- Jason

  8. #8
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    Dude, its 100 speed daylight reversal film. No special filters needed. Shoot it as you would any other 100 speed e-6 film. Don't buy $1000 of it until you've sampled some.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    Film photography? This term kills me. As if there's another kind!

  9. #9

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    It's very hard to find short ends of 100D. In fact it's getting harder to buy 100D at all - the only remaining 35mm size is the 400ft roll on a core. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that Kodak canned up a master roll of it for some cinematographers that were demanding it, and once those all get sold, there will be no more. It's still pretty popular with the 16mm and 8/super-8 crowd but I'm betting it's virtually unused by 35mm cinematographers these days.

    At $475 for 400 feet I considered it no bargain at all compared to buying normal still camera film from Kodak... but now that it's the only reversal film left maybe that price doesn't seem so bad. But grab it while you can, like I said I bet once the frozen supply at Kodak is gone, it's gone. (Movie film is not given an expiration date - it's assumed to be a short path from Kodak to the camera to the lab - so they can and will just keep selling it for however long it is until it's gone, if my theory is correct.)

    If you send it off to a lab for processing, you should make sure they are OK with this (from the data sheet ):

    Note: KODAK EKTACHROME 100D Color Reversal Film 5285 / 7285 contains special sensitizing and filter dyes that improve color reproduction. Because these dyes are designed to rinse out of the film during processing, they will change the color of the first developer, the reversal bath, the final wash, and the final rinse. This solution discoloration is only cosmetic. It will not affect sensitometry or the quality of any Process E-6 film or control material. However, the solutions will cause splicing tape and processing equipment (rollers, racks, etc.) to have a pinkish color. The pink dye residue can easily be washed off processing equipment by following normal maintenance procedures.
    Duncan
    Last edited by frobozz; 03-30-2012 at 10:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by frobozz View Post
    It's very hard to find short ends of 100D. In fact it's getting harder to buy 100D at all - the only remaining 35mm size is the 400ft roll on a core. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that Kodak canned up a master roll of it for some cinematographers that were demanding it, and once those all get sold, there will be no more. It's still pretty popular with the 16mm and 8/super-8 crowd but I'm betting it's virtually unused by 35mm cinematographers these days.
    I'm surprised it took 9 months...

    http://motion.kodak.com/motion/About...0514/index.htm

    Duncan

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