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  1. #11
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    I have washed (both washes) as long as 20 minutes with a Gravity Works film washer that changes the water completely every minute and still I get a Final Rinse that turns slightly pink.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

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  2. #12
    Athiril's Avatar
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    I don't have this problem, I don't use a washer, I just stand my film in still water at processing temp for 5-10 minutes, then I come back, water is pink, I change it, I repeat this until the water is clear, not pink. Works well, I put the reels in a beaker so I can easily see the water colour.

  3. #13

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    So far with the Tetenal kits that I have used, I haven't had this problem either. I use a Patterson tank with the special hose attachment they sell hooked up to a sink for my washing. I turn the water on to a good flow, attach the hose to the tank and let it run for 7 minutes, so far no problems (other than the water bill).

  4. #14
    Athiril's Avatar
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    You could possibly save your waste water and put it into a simple solar still for re-usage.

  5. #15

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    That would work in the summer, I could use it for my gardens. Winter is another matter.

  6. #16
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    "Ilford style" fill, agitate & dump (repeat X times) wash surely saves water. It has been continuously debated whether it saves time or not and whether 4 repeats is enough or not, but in any case, 7-8 repeats, 30 seconds each, is enough without a doubt and conserves quite a bit water. If you have a slight pink discoloration after this treatment, it surely is not any kind of problem. You can ask any lab technician how their final rinses look like...

    In professional cine style labs, multi-stage countercurrent washes are absolutely preferred and recommended by Kodak. In small tank processing, you cannot use the waste water coming from the "next" stage so easily (unless you can summon it from the future), but of course, you can save your last wash waters until the next process, to be used in the beginning of the final wash.

    For example, if you use 8 wash cycles and save the water from the last four to be used as first four cycles next time (in the same order), you can cut your water usage by half.
    Last edited by hrst; 04-09-2012 at 02:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    Athiril's Avatar
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    I find I only change water 4-5 times with just letting it soak for extended time until the water is clear.

    Also with these methods of non-constant flow, you can re-use your waste water from the solar still idea for your film again, so you're not just re-using water you'd otherwise tip down the drain, but reducing your consumption.

  8. #18

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    If I was to use a solar still, that would create pure distilled water, yes? Assuming that the water is true distilled, I could use it for mixing my chemicals and for the "final" rinse and photo-flo dunk?

  9. #19
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    Ummm, NO!

    You see, the bleaches, blixes and fixes use Ammonia in them. Ammonia is quite volatile and can be distilled over. The Ammonia can "do bad things" if it builds up. That is why you want to wash well.

    LESSON: You cannot make distilled water easily from water that contains Ammonium ions. You have to make it into Distilled Deionized water.

    PE

  10. #20

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    Thanks for that critical bit of information, PE. I greatly appreciate it. I know others have told you so, but now I am saying it. Its great having you here!

    So I think I will just put up with the slightly higher water bill and continue to rinse the daylights out of my film. The times I really go on developing benders, my bill goes up by about $3.

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