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View Poll Results: Would you buy & use a modern Autochrome-type film?

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78. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yeah, probably.

    52 66.67%
  • Probably not.

    6 7.69%
  • Would have to see the results first.

    20 25.64%
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  1. #51
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Autochrome.
    Grains are from 5-10 microns, 1700-2500 grains per linear inch

    Dufaycolor.
    Spacing of red lines = 533 lines per inch.

    Finlay.
    240 filter squares per square inch

    Thames Screen Plate.
    Each circle was 1/400 of an inch wide
    From Wikipedia, Additive film (such as Polavision and Polachrome slide film) used a colour mask of microscopically thin transparent red, green, and blue lines (3000 lines per inch)

    A significant improvement over the previous methods.

    Elsewhere, "Polachrome"...has a color filter screen consisting of red, green and blue stripes with a resolution of 118 stripes/mm. All of these films are described in a publication "The Polaroid 35 mm Instant Slide System" by Samuel H. Liggero, Kenneth J. McCarthy and Joseph A. Stella.

  2. #52
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    No potato starches, nothing primitive like that. Note that I said Autochrome-like... all I mean by that is a red, green & blue screen. Though I do like the gem stones idea! How 'bout ruby, sapphire and emerald? That will be reserved for the professional line.

    Reading J.S. Friedman's History of Color Photography and the chapter on formation of screen-plates will give you some idea of the innumerable ways people have proposed to do this before. And then there's E.J. Wall's History of Three-Colour Photography...

    All I'll say at present is that it's a "classic" method, though never used in a product as far as I know.

    I personally have no interest in an inkjet screen, but I'd support anyone working on that.

    .
    I Have A 355 Carat Sapphire, Just Sitting Here Doing Nothing ...

    Ron
    .

  3. #53
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Oh, yes, that would be fantastic.

    It is indeed years that I'm trying to devise a method to create a home-made Autochrome plate.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  4. #54
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Gilardetti View Post
    It is indeed years that I'm trying to devise a method to create a home-made Autochrome plate.
    I'd love to hear about your efforts, if you'd like to share.

  5. #55

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    And what is wrong with potato starch? And could inkjet water soluble ink be used to dye such starch?

  6. #56
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Yes, starch is good but grainy. Yes, inkjet inks could be used provided that they stay put during processing.

    PE

  7. #57

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    Well they would stay put if the starch layer is shellacked over (or nowadays, I guess polyurethaned). Of course, one would want a "varnish" that would not cause the dyes to fade.

    I assume - and it is a pity - that because of the black and white layer behind the dyed starches, the autochrome process lends itself only to transparencies and not reflected light substrates. Otherwise, I was hypothesizing a removeable layer that could be exposed on a glass plate, then removed and repositioned onto paper.

    But I am way out of line - I haven't even made my own emulsion yet, so what do I know!

  8. #58
    kb3lms's Avatar
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    inkjet inks could be used provided that they stay put during processing.
    My thinking was along the lines of printing the color filter screen (say a Bayer pattern) on the base using a water insoluble inkjet dye with a high-resolution inkjet printer. There are also 4 mil sheets made for the screen printing industry that claim to be waterproof once printed with regular inks and the ink won't run. IDK exactly if that's true but the materials aren't hard to find. You could then coat the base on the other side (assuming it was subbed) with a suitable emulsion.

    Or, you could possibly even print the filter screen on this waterproof subbed side and then coat the emulsion on directly on top of it?

    Assuming the ink could be made to stay put and was available to the average person, then it would seem to me that anyone with a photo quality inkjet printer could make a (crude) DIY color transparency film. The quality of the screen (and image) would depend on the quality of the printer, I suppose.

    Even if the waterproof material didn't work as claimed, I have to believe there are water insoluble inks available. There are certainly inkjet printable films available, maybe Melinex 535 would work?

    I believe some inkjet inks are water based and others are solvent based. I think you'd want a dye ink, though. I have a feeling a pigment ink would not work as well.

  9. #59
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Those that printed screens on transparent support have done what is suggested here. But, you must remember that this is not Autochrome but rather is more related to Dufay.

    And, I repeat here - think about this - there is no means (AFAIK) for producing a reflection additive product. None whatsoever. In fact, I have discussed it with others who should know and they agree. In fact, this may have been why Neg-Pos additive products were never made, only the Neg could be made with that technology.

    PE

  10. #60

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    I'm still confused at how the neg would work. Presumably, you just develop the plate as a b&w negative. But what about the starch dyes? Would you use C,Y,M? So if say you had red light, you'd get adjacent Y&M starch grains letting light through? I find it easier to conceptualize where dealing with a positive and the dyes are essentially RGB.

    I have some old Liquid Light emulsion that I must have bought ages ago, maybe it's time to see if it's still any good.



 

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