Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,920   Posts: 1,522,022   Online: 922
      

View Poll Results: Would you buy & use a modern Autochrome-type film?

Voters
78. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yeah, probably.

    52 66.67%
  • Probably not.

    6 7.69%
  • Would have to see the results first.

    20 25.64%
Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 345678910 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 100
  1. #81
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    798
    newcan1,

    I'm currently working out / working on the details of a fairly straightforward, historically faithful autochrome (my personal holy grail when I started making emulsions.) It's looking quite doable. Give serious consideration to learning to make your own emulsions. I think that's pretty much key. Good luck and thank you for consistently thoughtful posts. They make good reading.

    d
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Film, and Dry Plates.

  2. #82

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    496
    Images
    11
    dwross, thanks for the comment. It's definitely something I am very interested in, although I'm a bit short of resources right now. Maybe later this year, my better half will buy me PE's book and CD, which I assume would be an excellent place for someone like me to start. I used to love chemistry in high school, and now I like the processing side of film developing, so it would be a natural fit.

  3. #83
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    798
    I haven't read PE's book, but I have to assume also that it's an educational publication. I know 'holmburgers' is studying it. Perhaps he can give you some clues without divulging too much of PE's copyrighted info. Anyway, best of luck and fun with your explorations.
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Film, and Dry Plates.

  4. #84
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,412
    Images
    2
    I definitely recommend getting Mr. Mowrey's book when you're able. It's the most up-to-date look we have at emulsions today. I believe most of the information in there is generally public, that is, from patents and publications or from Ron's personal work & experience. The caveat is that Ron is skilled in the arts; he's put it all together.

    I really do think that this compliments Denise's approach to emulsion making, or Mark Osterman's approach, and others. Simple and inventive techniques that don't require expensive equipment, guided by a more advanced understanding of what might be going on in the emulsion.

  5. #85
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,926
    Images
    65
    An old truism!

    Cooperation leads to graduation!

    Thanks Chris.

    Pe

  6. #86
    hrst's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,300
    Images
    1
    Emulsion making is a very good example of a process that you can just start doing without too much thought given at that point, and later develop it to higher standards. You can start with very small darkroom, basic kitchenware, food gelatin etc. The odds are, you may get a usable product right away or not, but that's a good starting point anyway. Then it becomes a progressive process of testing, acquiring more information, testing and so on.

    I did my first without much planning beforehand.

  7. #87

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    496
    Images
    11
    Well in preparation, I need to eliminate the light leaks in my darkroom and get organized. My darkroom is about 15 x 30ft and there are many places light leaks in -- not enough to stop me doing printing, but faster emulsions could be affected. Also, it seems silver nitrate is about $1 per gram, which would be quite an investment if you need say 50g for a starting batch that might not even turn out properly. This all sounds like something that could be the subject of Christmas presents.

  8. #88
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    798
    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    Emulsion making is a very good example of a process that you can just start doing without too much thought given at that point, and later develop it to higher standards. You can start with very small darkroom, basic kitchenware, food gelatin etc. The odds are, you may get a usable product right away or not, but that's a good starting point anyway. Then it becomes a progressive process of testing, acquiring more information, testing and so on.

    I did my first without much planning beforehand.
    Do you mind if I quote you on The Light Farm?!

    I've been (trying) to preach that for years, but the conversations here always seem to come back to putting the BIG horse before the cart.

    newcan1,
    Your impression of what you need and how much you need before you can even get started is a perfect example. You don't need a fancy space, and unsensitized, unwashed emulsions won't be offended by tiny light leaks. You can --and actually should-- make your recipes with 5-6 grams of silver. There are two reasons for this. 1) That's about as big a batch of emulsion has you can reasonably handle at a time, and 2) you'll want to practice, practice, practice.

    Think of it like bread making. Would it be ideal to make a batch of dough with 20 pounds of flour? You'd need a commercial kitchen with commercial machinery and ovens. Then, you wouldn't have to make bread for months, but would you even remember how to make bread after all that time? Far better to make small batches as often as possible. Each and every time, you'll learn a trick or two. The learning curve is amazing and an absolute rush. Once you know you love being an emulsion maker, you can commit to ordering more silver nitrate at a time. The bigger the order, the less $/gram. Buy a pound, and it's pretty affordable.

    I hope Ron's book has recipes scaled for the home darkroom and the beginner. If not, or even if so, I invite to look at the recipes on The Light Farm. Also, by this fall, I hope to have a new section organized around Jerevan's suggestion/request for a paper recipe that can be made in a temporary darkroom.

    Denise

    p.s. I'd give anything for a 15 x 30 ft space! I do all my work in a space a Paris chef would recognize.
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Film, and Dry Plates.

  9. #89

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    496
    Images
    11
    OK thanks - sorry I didn't mean to divert the discussion here. I just took a look at thelightfarm.com and I think I will be spending quite some time on there. You are right, I had thought I might need a lot more silver nitrate than it looks like I could get started with. I will continue my reading for now. I saw a link Ron had left to an old 1880's book on emulsions and it is truly fascinating.

    Again, sorry if I inadvertently moved the discussion away from Autochromes.

  10. #90
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    798
    In my opinion, you've actually moved the discussion in a good direction. Again, just my opinion, but I think the emulsion is key. The color screen is a challenge, without doubt, but it will all come down to the emulsion. I actually don't think many people will choose to make their own autochromes. I don't think the individual parts will be that difficult, but it will be very, very time-consuming. It definitely will not fit easily into the pace of the modern world. If holmburgers is planning on making this a commercial venture (yes! hopefully) he probably shouldn't be worried about d.i.y. competition .

    All the very best of luck and fun wherever your creativity takes you. (And, I hope The Light Farm helps.)
    d
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Film, and Dry Plates.

Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 345678910 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin