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  1. #1

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    Processing Velvia 50 at Wal-Mart

    A few months ago I dug out a partially used 100 ft roll of Velvia 50 that has been in my freezer for maybe 10 years since I bought it. At the time I cut a 36 frames roll out of it and shot it for testing. Everything was great back then. I have stored the remaining in the freezer ever since.

    This time I cut a 24 frame roll to shoot another round of testing. I sent it to Wal-Mart for processing. They sent to to a Fuji lab to do the actual processing. 10 days or so later I picked up the slides and found that the colors on the slides are rather poor. The exposure looks fine but the colors are off and ugly.

    There are two possible reasons. One is my film is too old and is no good any more. The other is poor processing. I have never had any processing done by Wal-Mart. I have yet another unopened 100 ft roll of this film. It has been in the freezer for so many years that I now want to get it exposed and processed. I don't know why I kept them for so long. I am willing to buy a Kodak E6 gallon kit to process it using my Jobo ATL 2300 processor. But I would like to make sure that my Velvia 50 is still good. My film is about 12 - 13 years old. It has been in the freezer for 10 years. How good a chance this film is still good? I think the reason I left it in the freezer for so long was because I was occupied by my Pentax 67ii with negatives. I still have quite some 35 mm negatives in my freezer waiting to be exposed.

    I know I have to test the Velvia again and send it to another lab to process. But if the film is likely garbage now I would rather simply forget it. Any suggestions? Thanks.

  2. #2
    hrst's Avatar
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    I've used some Velvia 50 at about 12-13 years old and it gave results with very magenta Dmax. It was usable though if this kind of effect was acceptable. However, it was probably stored at room temperature for years if not more, so your film may be in better condition. Still, definitely do not use it as a reference to evaluate processing quality.

    Attached an example. This was shot in a shade which compensates for the error. Frames shot in warm light conditions are very red.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails RUUTU01.jpg  

  3. #3
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtjade2007 View Post
    I sent it to Wal-Mart for processing. They sent to to a Fuji lab to do the actual processing. 10 days or so later I picked up the slides and found that the colors on the slides are rather poor. The exposure looks fine but the colors are off and ugly.
    Fuji shut down their E-6 lines years ago, and subcontracted the work. From what I've been able to determine, sending E-6 to Fuji through Walmart now actually goes to Dwayne's in Parsons, Kansas. The same place that did the last few years of Kodachrome. I've had good results with them on Kodak E-6 and Fuji Provia and Sensia in the last couple of years in both 35mm and 120. I don't have an answer to your problems, just wanted to mention where I think the processing is actually done.

    Lee

  4. #4
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Velvia does not keep well IME.

  5. #5
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    I echo Bruce. I had Velvia 2 years expired that had a very heavy magenta shift. Velvia 100 on the other hand, I have not had any issues.
    K.S. Klain

  6. #6
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    My Walmart won't take any slide film.

    RVP50 is not as stable as RVP50 II and RVP50 II has better reciprocity characteristics.

  7. #7

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    I've not had any problems getting my local Wal-Mart to accept slide film for send-out. I just put a big X through all the print options, check the special instructions box and mark it as E-6 slide film. Off it goes to Dwayne's, who has the contract for Fuji film developing, and I pick it up in a bit under 2 weeks.

    Are you getting a "Service not available" slip with your returned film, or what are you getting back when you try Wal-Mart's send-out?

    As for color, the Velvia 100 coming back from them looks rather warm, though whites are usually pretty close to pure white. I'm finding I prefer Provia's color palette for people shots to be much more to my liking, but for nature shots, Velvia 100 is awesome.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  8. #8

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    it wasn't fuji that processed it, it was dwaynes..
    up until 2 years ago, i sent lots of 35mm + 120 color,
    and cn/bw ( and even regular b/w ) film through sams club
    to fuji to dwaynes, and never had troubles.
    im empty, good luck

  9. #9
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ME Super View Post
    Are you getting a "Service not available" slip with your returned film, or what are you getting back when you try Wal-Mart's send-out?
    No, they won't even take it. They also send out C-41 now.

    As for color, the Velvia 100 coming back from them looks rather warm, though whites are usually pretty close to pure white. I'm finding I prefer Provia's color palette for people shots to be much more to my liking, but for nature shots, Velvia 100 is awesome.
    Astia is their "people film" but I agree that Provia is good, too. Provia can do adequate jobs of both Velvia and Astia, but of course there are some trade-offs in color saturation.

  10. #10

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    Thanks for the replies to my question. I don't think my Velvia 50 film was sent to dwayne's for processing. It looked like a Fuji lab. I could be wrong of course.

    I did some search on the internet and found some said that if kept in freezer Velvia 50 can be still good over 10 years. One even said that Velvia 50 tends to have a magenta cast without being expired. My slides did show a bit of the magenta cast. Here is one shot I scanned. I think I will test the film again and this time I will send it to Dwayne's directly and see what it comes out.Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by mtjade2007; 04-17-2012 at 03:11 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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