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  1. #21
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Yes, you could add BZA to the E6 developer and probably make it work.

    You see, I'm trying to lure you away so that my chemistry set stays bigger than yours. Nya, nya, nya !

    Seriously, I have found that some suppliers will order it for you and ship it to you for a price. Yes, expensive, but then you have it. Kodak quoted me $20,000 for a drum (smallest I could get from them of a chemical) and I found it elsewhere for $10. for 10 g which is all I needed. Everyone else wanted exorbitant prices for 20g - 100 g.

    PE

  2. #22
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    You know I've been conversing with Stefan4u and you know this guy has really been doing some heavy research on E6. He does have a source for HQMS that I don't, I will grant you that but some of his fine tuned formula are looking pretty good.
    I've been trying the watkins formulas and they do work. But my dmax is pretty crappy translucent blue.
    I was looking through some of my 35mm slides that I processed (beseler 1g kit)NA, probably 30yrs ago now and they look sooo much better !!!! It isn't even funny. The blacks were really BLACKS
    Last edited by cinejerk; 04-22-2012 at 06:08 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typos and additions always more typos ;-)

  3. #23
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    Yeah, well there are other problems too. You have to look out for crossover, bad grain, bad sharpness and bad color reproduction (apart from the crossover). Most homemade formulas just do not work out for a variety of reasons.

    BTW, you can make HQ Monosulfonate by the method several of us described a few years ago here on APUG. Make a saturated solution of either Potassium Sulfite or Sodium Sulfite. Dissolve in it, X grams of HQ and then add y grams of regular old Hydrogen Peroxide. I forget the x and y, but the exact procedure is here somewhere.

    PE

  4. #24
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    Yes I have that exact thread saved somewhere. Can you use the resulting soup directly? Or does it need to be purified some way? That is a HUGE thread. I'll have to re-read it.

    I did a test film with the macbeth chart and the color repro looked pretty good. Just those unexposed borders should have been black, black.

    They are dark blue and you can see through them. UHG !!!!!

  5. #25
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    If they are not black, then there are other erros.

    The HQMS is not pure and has excess sulfite present.

    PE

  6. #26
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Most people won't have scales precise enough for colour chemistry where precision and consistency is paramount. This is most critical where small volumes are being made up and is the soucre of mny inconsistencies.

    My old analog pan balances weigh accurately to +/- 0.01g, my lab balances were capable of much higher precision +/- 0.00001g but at a price way outside home users.

    Ian

  7. #27
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    I agree 100% Ian.

    I just bought another scale capable of 0.01g

    Maybe that will help some.

  8. #28
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinejerk View Post
    I agree 100% Ian.

    I just bought another scale capable of 0.01g

    Maybe that will help some.

    Just to put some reality to the degree of accuracy needed it's relative to the quantity and the application, when I use scales accurate to +/- 0.00001g that's with a sample weight of approx 0.2 gm and money riding on the accuracy of the results - precious metal assays.

    With a B&W developer and a 0.2g (or less - one dev uses 0.12g) quantity not unusual in a litre of dev containing Phenidone or Dimezone then +/- 0.01g is becoming significant. This is one reason I make up larger quantities typically 5 litres at a time of more concentrtated solutions. We don't need the same scale accuracy for 100gms though. But it is something e need to be aware of are weights +/- 1%, or tighter. Scales that weigh to +/- 0.01g for 0.2g of a chemical are only accurate to +/- 5% and if one chemical goes one way another the opposite the effects are compounded.

    Ian

  9. #29
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    So what exactly does ethylene diamine do in the color developer for the E6 process or VNF-1 for that matter?
    I guess I should ask the same question for the benzyl alcohol too.

    I'm playing around with some E6 color developer home brews that are starting to look pretty good. And none of them have ethylene diamine in them.

    If I could get my VNF-1 film to look even close to what I am seeing with E6 I would be very satisfied.

    I found this formula. I know it's not ethylene diamine but just wondering what part the EDTA Na4 is playing in this?

    E4 color developer
    cf. D. Murray, publ. in “Simplified Color Processing Formulas,” P. Dignan

    Water 110F 800 ml
    Sod. phosphate tribasic 40 g
    Sod. hydroxide 10% solution 80 ml, as required
    Benzyl alcohol 35% solution 10 ml
    Citrazinic acid 1.3 g
    EDTA Na4 3 g
    Sod. sulfite 5 g
    KI 0.2% solution 5 ml
    CD-3 12 g
    Water to make 1 liter
    Set pH 12.0 @ 80F using Sod. hydroxide 10% solution.

    Note: To make benzyl alcohol 35%
    Benzyl alcohol 35 ml
    Isopropyl alcohol 45 ml
    Water 20 ml
    Last edited by cinejerk; 04-26-2012 at 11:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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