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  1. #11
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Yes, SIWA, PET plastic (clear, brittle plastic) is the best thing to happen to storage in the past 20 years. And, best of all, they cost nothing because they are in every trash can. Fill to the very rim and use glass marbles to take up the slack. For small quantities use 50ml liquour bottles (with the metal cap). Great for storage of concentrates, too, but remember to always fill to the rim. - David Lyga

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwny View Post
    I read your FAQ as you suggested. Lots of good information, but it left me still wondering about the care of C-41 concentrates. In the FAQ it mentions that most b&w concentrates, e.g. Rodinal, are very stable and require no special treatment. It also says that mixed developer needs to have the oxygen removed from the bottle, and several methods are described. I didn't see anything that explicitly talks about the multi-part concentrates used for C-41 though.
    True.

    When you buy the concentrate, it comes packed in nitrogen but with typically very dodgy caps on bottles that won't properly reseal. I tend to rebottle it into 100mL glass bottles and that looks like it works but I haven't tested any concentrates that are more than a few months old via this method. I'll add to my FAQ once I know that this method is working for me.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    I use the Fuji (rated at 16 rolls/L unless process ISO400+), make up 1L at a go and put the 16 rolls through. Sometimes the developer spends 3mo in the fridge between processes but that's fine as long as there's absolutely no air in the bottle.

    See the Film FAQ in my signature and click on C41 for a bunch more info on storing developer.

    Sorry for bringing an old thread.

    I just bought 5L C41 and E6 kits from Fujihunt. I would like to use it a most economical way as possible, because i shoot maybe 5-10 rolls a month. Do you reuse mixed 1L for 16 rolls in 3mo period? I have Jobo CPE2 and it takes 240ml for 2 rolls of 135 film, do you return that used 240ml into a 1L mix?
    Last edited by Misko78; 05-21-2015 at 08:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
    hka
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    Take some (20) glass bottles of 250ml and top off. Use one of these when you need them for the 2 rolls of 135, 120 or 5-6 sheets 4*5" and discard after use. I always use it as one shot. Steady results with no or less changes in filtration (C41-RA4).
    harry

    Release, the best you can do...

  5. #15

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    With 5L C41 kit you can develop 80 135 or 120 films, with your method only 40 135 or 20 120. That is not what I plan to do.

    Edit: But with E6 kit (44 film from 5L) this method is quite good. But i wonder how long will mixed solution will last, divided in 20 bottles topped off and refrigerated. Unused mixed solution will last for 6 weeks, as stated in manual. Any ideas?
    Last edited by Misko78; 05-21-2015 at 11:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16

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    I use the developer, fixer and rinse one-shot, and recycle the bleach (almost indefinitely). For me, 5L will do about 40-44 rolls of either 35mm or 120 in a Phototherm SSK4. I find that mixed C41 developer is the only one that goes bad in any period of time. Usually a mixed batch of developer will last at most 3-4 weeks before getting unusable. (This is stored in PET, with a blanketing gas). I usually will save up 40+ rolls of film, and process it all at once over the course of 3-4 days, so the developer never has a change to go bad from age/oxidation.

    Good luck!

    -Ed

  7. #17
    bvy
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    Dump the "blanketing gas" and fill the bottles to capacity. I get a year or more this way. I tried using Bloxygen to preserve my Ilford PQ concentrate, and I think it went bad faster than if I had done nothing at all.

  8. #18
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    I mix the tetenal c-41 press kit in 3 1 lL brown glass bottles. I keep them in the fridge with wine stopper caps on them
    Akram
    https://500px.com/amellice

    Bracketing is the refuge of the unknowing, a trial-and-error procedure that is wasteful of film and weakens the sense of disciplined procedure. Ansel Adams

  9. #19

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    Compelled to weigh in on the matter of PET bottles.

    In the last year, I did immense amounts of research on water vapor permeability with the intention of extending dye inkjet print life. I examined publications that listed "perms", a measurement of permeability of many materials.

    Lurking in the background was my real life observation that a simple PET bottle of water, the very thin kind, will auto-collapse all by itself just sitting on a shelf in well under a year. Gas osmosis, water out.

    PET bottles of carbonated beverages are much thicker, of course. Gas/vapor transmission reduced by whatever factor in thickness.

    In my research I discovered things like the original Saran wrap was about as impervious as glass, but the replacements for the last bunch of years is just LDPE. Not so effective.

    And there is one very common, easily attainable material that is, for all practical purposes, a perfect moisture barrier. The envelope, please....................lacquer. Yup. You know how those cellophane packages of peanuts or Twinkies keep the content fresh forever in monsoon season? It's not the cello, it's the lacquer coating! Plain cello is moderately permeability, but it is the lacquer that makes it so much better.

    So, if you must use PET bottles - and who doesn't love the cost and non-breakability? - use ones from sparking beverages and give them a few quick coats of lacquer. It dries in a couple of minutes.

  10. #20
    hka
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    It last for more than a year fully topped off.
    Why not more than 20 rolls of 120? In my Jobo tanks I can spool up 2 rolls 120 or 135.
    harry

    Release, the best you can do...

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