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  1. #1

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    Color Sabattier effect with Fuji Superia 400

    I recently managed to score a big lot of Fuji Superia 400 at a dirt cheap price and I want to do some Sabattier effects with it. I have a pretty good idea on what I'm doing and I don't mind making mistakes, but I have some questions I want to ask before starting. Most of them regarding to your personal opinion + experience.

    How is Superia at the Sabattier effect? (curiously, how is slide film at this?)

    I heard that it is best to do a 4 stop underexposure (in camera) if I were to flash the film, and do a massive push development. Is this true?

    Does the color of the light that I use to flash the film change the final outcome? Eg, Tungsten vs. Flourescent lightbulbs.

    Is it better to leave Sabattier effect at the printing stage?

    Has anyone ever done a Sabattier print of an "Sabattiered" negative?

    I am aware of the Solarization Demystified website: http://www.cchem.berkeley.edu/wljeme/SOUTLINE.html
    which seems to use Solarization and Sabattier interchangeably, and also spells Sabattier as Sabatier (Wikipedia spells it on the former). I hope that I'm using the terms correctly, and I thank you for your input.

  2. #2
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    Ok, you do solarization on film in-camera. You do Sabattier on film or prints during processing. This is the normal course of events.

    That should at least straighten you out to the scientific terminology used in a more rigorous manner.

    Solarization is often very nice with B&W and often poor with color. Basically it involves long exposures and bright lights along with filters.

    Sabattier can be done on film or prints with a short exposure to white or colored light, but the exposure times for film are often so short it is impractical to do.

    I have done Sabattier prints in color and have posted them in the gallery. I have simulated color on color, but have not posted them as one stage is digital due to the problems with film.

    PE

  3. #3

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    Re: Solarization vs. Sabattier - That is exactly what I thought.

    I was afraid of a response like this :-(

    But for what it's worth, my original idea was that I'd rig a an electronic flash 5 feet up and flash the negative. Would this too intense?

  4. #4
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    It may be. IDK. Try it. I would suggest a 5w bulb about 20 feet away as a starting point myself. That flash is way too much IMHO.

    PE

  5. #5
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    I have flashed colour negative film halfway through the development process... mind you I was using a large dip and dunk machine and halfway through the development cylce we turned the room lights on and off for one steamboat.
    I plan to do this with 8x10 and 4x5 colour negative film this year for a specific project I have in mind.

    Very nice effect.. If you are rolling your film on a reel I am not so sure about even flow of light to the film closer to the core.
    If you are using 4x5 in hangers then its very easy ,, I do this every second weekend now with 8x10 and 4x4 FP4 for a project I am working on.
    Mr Jollys article is the best written that I have seen and was very accurate with his methods.. I have been able to follow his notes and get very predictable results.

    Give the colour a try if your darkroom and method of process allows you to do it.



 

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