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  1. #21
    Athiril's Avatar
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    I haven't printed it optically, but I incident metered in the shade and exposed for that for particular scene on Portra 400. This was mixed with heavy shade and hard sun, the subject I wanted was in the shade, so I exposed for my subject.

    Everything in the hard sun came out, nice mid tones in both at the same time.

    The difference in incident readings between the sunny area and shadey area was 5 stops.


    So the sunny area was overexposed by 5 stops (for subjects there), and the neg still held the detail fine.

  2. #22
    Dinesh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChristopherCoy View Post
    If you think I'm doing this for kicks you're diluted.
    Classic!
    Kick his ass, Sea Bass!

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dinesh View Post
    Classic!
    I'm not diluted, but I'm dilated to hear you are diluted
    Ben

  4. #24

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    What Flying Camera said about crossover in enlaring is directly equivalent to what I stated about
    cross-contamination of the dye curves. It's the practical result and it often can't be fixed, even by
    the know-it-all Photoshop crowd. Some color neg films, esp amateur ones, are designed for a lot of
    exposure error, but might still give acceptable skintones. But most other colors go to hell, and pretty much anything analogous in the scene turns to skintone. You might want to use this bias creatively, but it helps to know the ropes.

  5. #25
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Also, to add to what Drew and I were saying, although there may be detail in the highlights on the negative that can be burned in, what can also happen is that that the filtration for the highlight burn is different than the filtration required for the base exposure, because the exposure times are so different. Long story short - you're better off controlling exposure at the time of exposure rather than compensating after the fact. It's a bit of a case of "while it CAN be done, the more important question is, SHOULD it be done, or avoided if at all possible".

  6. #26
    RPC
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    Keep in mind that the need for burning in (and dodging as well) is often because of the dynamic range limitations of print material, and can't always be prevented by exposing properly.

  7. #27
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    From my experience burning in when printing color negs, the color will shift in the burned in area. You can compensate by dialing in a correction to compensate for the shift. That get's tricky. A cheat's way is to scan the neg and different exposure levels and blend them in Photoshop. Kinda like an analog/digital version of HDR photography. This technique is not for analog purist though

  8. #28
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    RPC - yes, photo paper has a limited contrast range and burning and dodging can't be avoided per-se by proper exposure, but proper exposure certainly reduces the amount you have to do. And you'll always have to decide in high contrast situations which end of the SBR you want to favor - is it more important to have highlight detail or shadow detail. I'd rather lose a little in the highlights and not have blocked up shadows, but I'd also rather have my shadows be true neutral/black rather than have a strange cast to them (which can also happen when dodging while printing color).

  9. #29
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    ...This technique is not for analog purist though


    Its ok. I wasn't planning on printing my own color stuff anyway. I was going to do the unspoken....

  10. #30

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    For those analog purists who do their own printing: you change the contrast simply with a contrast
    increase or contrast decrease silver mask. Differential masks can also be made for color correction or
    curve distribution. Anyone who has done high-quality chrome printing can figure this stuff out with
    a it of patience, and do it every bit as well as Photoshop, maybe better. What you cannot do in either case is correct parts of the negative where the different color layers have contaminated one
    another and created mud due to incorrect exposure in the first place.



 

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